Forestry and Natural Resources

Jeffrey T. Walton , Ph.D.

Interim Dean, Associate Professor

518-327-6236

The School of Forestry and Natural Resources offers five baccalaureate programs (BS), Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences; Forestry; Natural Resources Management and Policy; Natural Resources Sustainability and Recreation, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism, three associate degree programs: Forest Technology, Surveying Technology; and Aboriculture and Landscape Management and one certificate program: Geographic Information Systems.

The location of Paul Smith's College offers an exceptional opportunity for practical, experiential education in forestry, natural resources, recreation and surveying. The College is located in the midst of its own 14,200 acres of forests and lakes, which in turn is located within the north-central portion of the six-million-acre Adirondack Park. Our forest lands are actively managed and our management practices are certified by both the Forest Stewardship Council and the Sustainable Forestry Initiative. Nearby are numerous sites of value for the Division's programs, such as the High Peaks Wilderness Area, the St. Regis Canoe Area, the recreational and competitive sports facilities of Lake Placid, and a wide variety of other recreation, timber production, and fish and game management areas.

Complementing the natural laboratory offered by our location is the wide variety of forestry, natural resources, recreation and surveying facilities and equipment. These include state of the art geographic information systems, global positioning systems and surveying equipment; wildlife and fisheries equipment; a sawmill and dry kiln; logging equipment; a wide range of hand and power tools; camping, canoeing, and other recreational equipment; a small engine repair shop; a high-tech organic maple sugaring operation; and draft horses. The Forestry, Natural Resources, and Recreation Division is also a certified Game of Logging Training Organization, which emphasizes training and certification in safe and efficient forest harvesting methods. Additional opportunities for certifications are available, depending on program.

Summer Sessions and Externships

Students in the Forestry, Forest Technology, and Surveying Technology programs must attend an academic summer session, generally between their first and second year. The length of the summer session varies by program, ranging from three weeks (Surveying Technology) to eight weeks (Forest Technology). Several programs require externships or Industry work experience, including Recreation, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism, Surveying, and Aboriculture and Landscape Management. Optional externships are offered for Forestry (B.S.) and the Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences (B.S.).

Equipment Requirements and Use

Instruction takes place in the field throughout the academic year, so appropriate field clothing is a necessity. Cold weather clothing, rain gear, and sturdy work clothes are recommended. Students in some programs are required to purchase steel-toed boots and a hard hat with eye and ear protection. Other field equipment may be required on a program-specific basis.

Students are reminded that many academic courses require the use of sophisticated and/or expensive instruments and tools. A student assumes responsibility when using this equipment and will be charged for any repairs or replacement necessitated by negligence or misuse.

Safety

Paul Smith's College maintains an excellent safety record. Students are taught that safety comes first, and are required to adhere to all safety guidelines.

Our Educational Approach

The School of Forestry and Natural Resources is proud of its experiential approach and the very practical skills and knowledge that our students develop, recognizing that the management of natural resources is becoming increasingly complex. The sound academic training that Paul Smith's students receive also contributes to their success after graduation. No matter what Forestry and Natural Resources program students pursue, they will also gain competence in communication skills, science, mathematics, social sciences, and humanities. In addition, there are unique opportunities for study abroad that are supported by the college’s special endowment for international study in natural resources. Students in the division have complemented their studies at the college by pursuing study abroad opportunities in several counties, including Brazil, Senegal, Costa Rica, Australia, and New Zealand.

Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, B.S.

The Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences B.S. Program at Paul Smith's College, with concentrations in Fisheries Science and Wildlife Science, offers students the education needed for entry-level positions in state and federal agencies, non-profit organizations and private consulting firms and prepares students for graduate education. Program content is based upon emerging issues in natural resource management and on certification requirements of professional organizations such as the American Fisheries Society and the Wildlife Society. Program activities are coordinated with the Adirondack Watershed Institute, a research and outreach organization based at Paul Smith's College.

This degree includes both a set of program core requirements and core electives (48) credits), and completion of an 18 -to 21 -credit concentration within either Fisheries or Wildlife Sciences. A minimum of 60 credits are liberal arts and science courses; at least 45 credits of the minimum of 120 approved credits required are in the upper-division. The degree is offered within a standard eight-semester sequence, providing opportunity for summer employment, internships or additional studies.

General Education and General Electives including:

 

 

 

Written Communication Foundation

BIO 102: Biology II

Written Communication Reinforcing

 

MAT 125: College Algebra (QP-F)

Social & Cultural Foundation

Responsibility & Expression Foundation

 

MAT 180: Precalculus

Social & Cultural Reinforcing

Responsibility & Expression Reinforcing

 

BIO 101: Biology I

 

 

 

 

 

 

Core Requirements

 

 

 

FWS 101: Intro to Fisheries and Wildlife Management

MAT 210: Statistics

GIS 201: Intro to GIS

 

FWS 270: Natural History of North American Vertebrates

BIO 210: General Ecology

**SOC 461: Capstone Project Planning Seminar

 

CHM 141: Chemistry I

BIO 225: Genetics

**SOC 462: Senior Capstone Project

 

CHM 142: Chemistry II

NRS 432: Landscape Ecology

 

 

CHM 241: Organic Chemistry

 

 

 

 

 

Concentration Core Courses:

 

 

 

Fisheries Science Concentration Core

 

 

 

BIO 457: Aquatic Invertebrates

ENV 471: Stream Ecology Management

FWS 480: Fisheries Biology and Management

 

BIO 362: Ichthyology

ENV 361: Limnology

FWS 331: Fisheries Techniques

 

NRS 340: Watershed Management

FOR 330: Forest Soils

PHY 241: Physics

 

 

 

 

 

OR

 

 

Wildlife Sciences Concentration Core

 

 

 

BIO 204: Plant Biology

FWS 320: Techniques in Wildlife Management

 

 

ENV 330: Conservation Biology

FWS 470: Wildlife Management

 

 

 

 

 

In addition to completing the respective concentration core courses, students will complete a Program Director- and/or Division Dean-approved sequence of elective courses within their selected core, choosing as follows:

Fisheries Sciences Concentrations Electives:

 

 

 

Biologicial Sciences Cluster (Students must choose 2 courses)

Human Dimensions Cluster (Students must choose 2 courses)

 

 

Animal Behavior

ENV 420: Environmental Impact Assessment

 

 

FWS 430: Aquatic Plants

ENV 315: Environmental Law/ Regulatory Processes

 

 

BIO 361: Entomology

HUM 270: Ethics

 

 

BIO 476: Winter Ecology

EST 320: Global Environmental Studies

 

 

FOR 310: Forest Ecology

NRS 331: Land Use Planning

 

 

BIO 220: Evolution

POL 202: Politics of the Environment

 

 

ENV 330: Conservation Biology

NRS 410: Natural Resource Economics

 

 

BIO 350: Anatomy and Physiology I

ENV 455: Sustainable Development

 

 

BIO 351: Anatomy and Physiology II

FWS 210: Wildlife Law Enforcement

 

 

BIO 363: Mammalogy

 

 

 

BIO 364: Ornithology

 

 

 

BIO 371: Microbial Ecology

 

 

 

BIO 472: Paleoecology

 

 

 

BIO 474: Physiological Ecology

 

 

 

ENV 473: Wetlands Ecosystems & Management

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wildlife Sciences Concentration Electives:

 

 

 

Biological Sciences Cluster (Students must choose 2 courses)

Botany Cluster (Students choose one course)

Policy, Administration and Law Cluster (Students choose one course)

 

Animal Behavior

BIO 335: Plant Ecology and Systematics

COM 300: Dispute Management

 

FOR 310: Forest Ecology

BIO 355: Plant Physiology

ENV 420: Environmental Impact Assessment

 

FWS 430: Aquatic Plants

FWS 430: Aquatic Plants

POL 202: Politics of the Environment

 

BIO 457: Aquatic Inverte

FOR 110: Dendrology

FWS 210: Wildlife Law Enforcement

 

BIO 361: Entomology

FOR 380: Understory and Ground Cover Flora

ENV 315: Environmental Law/ Regulatory Processes

 

BIO 320: Evolution

 

NRS 331: Land Use Planning

 

BIO 350: Anatomy and Physiology I

 

NRS 410: Natural Resource Economics

 

BIO 351: Anatomy and Physiology II

 

ENV 455: Sustainable Development

 

BIO 455: Biotechnology

 

 

 

BIO 362: Ichthyology

 

 

 

BIO 371: Microbial Ecology

 

 

 

FWS 331: Fisheries Techniques

 

 

 

BIO 472: Paleoecology

 

 

 

BIO 474: Physiological Ecology

 

 

 

BIO 476: Winter Ecology

 

 

 

FWS 480: Fisheries Biology and Management

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ecosystem Management Cluster (Students choose one course)

Physical Science Cluster (Students choose one course)

Restricted Elective (Students choose two courses)

 

FOR 340: Forest Management

PHY 241: Physics

BIO 363: Mammalogy

 

NRS 340: Watershed Management

ENV 350: Atmospheric Science

BIO 364: Ornithology

 

ENV 473: Wetlands Ecosystems & Management

ENV 120: Geology

BIO 366: Herpetology

 

ENV 471: Stream Ecology Management

 

 

 

 

 

 

**Student may opt to take NRS 499 ST: Integrate Natural Resource Mgt., 4 credits, to complete both capstone requirements.

Forestry, B.S.

The Forestry Bachelor's degree builds on the long tradition of forestry education at Paul Smith's College. The strength of the program is the foundation of technical, field-based, and experiential education that is available to students that combines forest science theory and practice. Although it is not required, students in the Forestry Bachelor's program may also acquire one of our two-year technical degrees.

There are five concentrations available within the Forestry Bachelor's degree program. Ecological Forest Management is the most general of these and will prepare students for positions with government forestry agencies, forestry consulting firms, and non-governmental organizations. The Industrial Forestry Operations concentration is best-suited for students interested in working for forest products companies or running their own forest products firm. Vegetation Management is an excellent concentration for students with an interest in working in urban forestry, for tree care companies, for utility companies, and for resorts and other employers that manage grounds and landscapes. Forest Biology, a science-based concentration, is ideal for a student who plans to go on to graduate school and specialize in a field such as forest ecology or forest entomology. Recreation Resource Management students will be well prepared for employment by government park agencies or to work as recreation specialists with large forest products companies or other large landowners. Regardless of the concentration, graduates of the Forestry program are also well prepared to continue their studies in graduate school if they choose. Each graduate of this program will have completed a rigorous core curriculum that includes forestry and related courses. The student will also have acquired the solid foundation in liberal arts and sciences, as well as in communications skills, necessary to be an effective professional and a responsible citizen.

A minimum of 124 credits with a minimum of 36 credits of 300/400 level courses and 60 credits of Liberal Arts and Sciences credits is required for the B.S. degree.

General Education Required Courses

 

 

Written Communication Foundation

Responsibility & Expression Reinforcing

 

Written Communication Reinforcing

Responsibility & Expression Integrated

 

MAT 125: College Algebra

Social & Cultural Foundation

 

MAT 210: Statistics

Social & Cultural Reinforcing

 

BIO 101: Biology I

Social & Cultural Integrated

 

BIO 102: Biology II

Quantitative Problem Solving Integrated

 

Responsibility & Expression Foundation

 

Core Forestry Required Courses

 

 

FOR 101: Introduction to Forestry

FWS 201: Introduction to Wildlife Management

 

FOR 110: Dendrology

GIS 220: Aerial Photo Interpretation

 

FOR 241: Forest Mensuration OR FOR 245: Forest Measurements

SOC 461: Capstone Project Planning Seminar

 

FOR 260: Silviculture

SOC 462: Senior Capstone Project

 

FOR 310: Forest Ecology

 

Forestry Summer Session

 

 

FOR 255: Measurements and Mapping

FOR 265: Forestry Field Ecology

Cognate Required Courses

 

 

CHM 141: Chemistry I

ECN 102: Microeconomics

 

COM 101: Speech (OCEO)

 

 

COM 105: Business Communication OR COM 210: Technical Communications

 

Requirements

Concentration Requirements as shown on next page.

Ecological Forest Management Concentration

Concentration Requirements

 

 

FOR 120: Insects and Diseases of Trees OR FOR 230: Forest Health

SRV 245: Principles of Surveying

FOR 340: Forest Management

FOR 330: Forest Soils

FOR 350: Forest Policy

FOR 420: Advanced Silviculture

GIS 201: Introduction to GIS

NRS 410: Natural Resource Economics

 

 

 

 

Methods Cluster (choose 2)*

 

 

REC 270: Recreation Resource Management

NRS 331: Land Use Planning

REC 310: Risk Management and Liability

GIS 335: Advanced GIS Techniques

BIO 430: Biometrics

FOR 395: Forestry Externship

COM 300: Dispute Management

ENV 431: Environmental Simulation Modeling

GIS 420: GIS Applications

 

 

 

Ecology Cluster (Choose 1)*

 

 

BIO 210: General Ecology

NRS 432: Landscape Ecology

ENV 473: Wetland Ecosystems and Management

FOR 430: Forest Pest Management

FOR 380: Understory and Ground Cover Flora

ENV 450: Advanced Conservation Science

ENV 330: Conservation Biology

NRS 340: Watershed Management

 

 

 

 

Forest Biology Concentration

Concentration Requirements

 

 

FOR 120: Insects and Diseases of Trees OR FOR 230: Forest Health

ENV 330: Conservation Biology

BIO 210: General Ecology

FOR 330: Forest Soils

CHM 241: Organic Chemistry OR PHY 241: Physics I

BIO 225: Genetics

FOR 340: Forest Management

FOR 350: Forest Policy

NRS 410: Natural Resource Economics

 

 

 

Biological Sciences Cluster (Choose 2)*

 

 

BIO 204: Plant Biology

NRS 432: Landscape Ecology

BIO 361: Entomology

ENV 222: Natural Habitat Interpretation

BIO 355: Plant Physiology

BIO 476: Winter Ecology

ENV 361: Limnology

BIO 474: Physiological Ecology

BIO 335: Plant Ecology and Systematics

FOR 380: Understory and Ground Cover Flora

ENV 473: Wetland Ecosystems and Management

BIO 472: Paleoecology

 

 

 

General Education, Electives and Required Courses

Written Communication Foundation

BIO 102: Biology II

Written Communication Integrated

Responsibility & Expression Foundation

MAT 125: College Algebra

Social & Cultural Foundation

MAT 210: Statistics

6 credits Upper Division Electives

BIO 101: Biology I

Electives as needed

Industrial Forest Operations Concentration

Concentration Requirements

 

 

FOR 150: Sawmill Lecture

NRS 410: Natural Resource Economics

FOR 400: Forest Products

SRV 245: Principles of Surveying

FOR 340: Forest Management

 

FOR 350: Forest Policy

FOR 320: Industrial Forest Operations

 

 

 

 

Business Cluster (choose 2)*

 

 

ACC 101: Financial Accounting

MGT 101: Introduction to Entrepreneurship

MKT 200: Principles of Marketing and Sales

ACC 102: Managerial Accounting

FIN 310: Finance

MGT 400: Strategic Planning and Policy

MGT 201: Business Law

MGT 310: Human Resource Management

MGT 200: Principles of Management

MGT 320: The Family Enterprise

ECN 400: The Global Market

REC 310: Risk Management and Liability

 

 

 

Resource Management Cluster (choose 2)*

 

 

GIS 201: Introduction to GIS

NRS 331: Land Use Planning

ENV 315: Environmental Law and Regulatory Process

REC 270: Recreation Resource Management

COM 300: Dispute Management

FOR 420: Advanced Silviculture

FOR 220: Lumber Manufacturing and Kiln Drying

NRS 432: Landscape Ecology

ENV 455: Sustainable Development

NRS 340: Watershed Management

FOR 395: Forestry Externship

 

 

 

 

General Education, Electives and Required Courses

Written Communication Foundation

BIO 102: Biology II

Written Communication Integrated

Responsibility & Expression Foundation

MAT 125: College Algebra

Social & Cultural Foundation

MAT 210: Statistics

6 credits Upper Division Electives

BIO 101: Biology I

Electives as needed

Recreation Resource Management

Concentration Requirements

 

 

REC 101: Introduction to Recreation

GIS 201: Introduction to GIS

NRS 410: Natural Resource Economics

REC 270: Recreation Resource Management OR REC 215: Recreation and Environmental Problems

REC 350: Park Management

REC 275: Design & Administration of Recreation Facilities

 

 

 

Recreation Cluster (choose 2)*

 

 

REC 290: Outdoor Recreation Leadership

REC 280: Winter Recreation

REC 320: Adventure Travel and Ecotourism

REC 250: Recreation Leadership and Maintenance

REC 361: Expedition Planning

REC 355: Visitor Management Services

REC 240: Recreation Program Planning

REC 340: Facilities Management

REC 362: Eco-Adventure Practicum

 

 

 

Resource Management Cluster (choose 2)*

 

 

GIS 335: Advanced GIS Techniques

REC 132: Interpreting the Environment

FOR 350: Forest Policy

FOR 140: Arboriculture I

NRS 331: Land Use Planning

ENV 315: Environmental Law and Regulatory Process

NRS 320: Environmental Resource Analysis

COM 300: Dispute Management

REC 310: Risk Management and Liability

NRS 335: Wilderness Management

ENV 455: Sustainable Development

FOR 395: Forestry Externship

GIS 420: GIS Applications

 

 

 

 

General Education, Electives and Required Courses

Written Communication Foundation

BIO 102: Biology II

Written Communication Integrated

Responsibility & Expression Foundation

MAT 125: College Algebra

Social & Cultural Foundation

MAT 210: Statistics

6 credits Upper Division Electives

BIO 101: Biology I

Electives as needed

Vegetation Management Concentration

Concentration Requirements

 

 

FOR 120: Insects and Diseases of Trees

FOR 250: Arboriculture II

BIO 355: Plant Physiology

FOR 130: Landscape Fundamentals & Interpretation

FOR 330: Forest Soils

FOR 285: Urban Forestry Issues

FOR 140: Arboriculture I

GIS 201: Introduction to GIS

FOR 440: Utility Vegetation Management

 

 

 

Business Cluster (choose 2)*

 

 

ACC 101: Financial Accounting

MGT 101: Introduction to Entrepreneurship

MKT 200: Principles of Marketing

ACC 102: Managerial Accounting

FIN 310: Finance

MGT 400: Strategic Planning and Policy

MGT 201: Business Law

MGT 310: Human Resource Management

MGT 200: Principles of Management

MGT 320: The Family Enterprise

ECN 400: The Global Market

REC 310: Risk Management and Liability

 

 

 

Vegetation Management Cluster (choose 2)*

 

 

GIS 335: Advanced GIS Techniques

BIO 335: Plant Ecology and Systematics

FOR 395: Forest Externship

FOR 370: Ornamental Dendrology

FOR 430: Pest Management

GIS 420: GIS Applications

FOR 380: Understory and Ground Cover Flora

NRS 432: Landscape Ecology

 

 

 

 

General Education Required Courses

 

Written Communication Foundation

Responsibility & Expression Foundation

MAT 125: College Algebra

Responsibility & Expression Integrated

MAT 210: Statistics

Social & Cultural Foundation

BIO 101: Biology I

Social & Cultural Integrated

BIO 102: Biology II

Quantitative Problem Solving Integrated

Electives as needed

 

Natural Resources Management and Policy, B.S.

Few things are more important to human societies than the wise and sustainable management of natural resources, upon which they all depend. As human populations continue to grow in size and affluence, the pressure to use natural resources will only continue to increase, as will the number of conflicts surrounding their use. To be effective in dealing with these challenges, natural resource managers of the 21st century will require a sound understanding of the sciences that apply to natural resources, an understanding of how decisions regarding their use are made, and excellent communication skills.

Natural Resources Management and Policy prepares students for the challenges ahead with an approach based on a blend of the natural and environmental sciences, technical training in natural resource management-related subject, and a solid foundation of the liberal arts. Included in this blend are numerous opportunities to take highly experiential courses that will have students out in the forests, in the lakes or in the wetlands that surround the campus. Graduates of this program are well prepared for positions with local, state and federal agencies involved in natural resource management or environmental consulting firms and non-profit environmental organizations.

General Education Electives and General Electives:

 

Written Communication Foundation

Quantitative Problem Solving Reinforcing

BIO 101: Biology I

 

Written Communication Reinforcing

Social & Cultural Foundation

BIO 102: Biology II

 

Responsibility & Expression Foundation

ECN 102: Microeconomics

BIO 210: General Ecology

 

Quantitative Problem Solving Foundation

HUM 270: Ethics

 

 

 

 

 

Core Requirements

 

23 credits

 

NRS 340: Watershed Management

ENV 315: Env Law & Regulatory Processes

HUM 400: Nature and Art

 

ENV 420: Environmental Impact Assessment

ENV 455: Sustainable Development

SOC 461: Capstone Project Planning Seminar

 

SOC 462: Capstone Project

NRS 410: Natural Resource Economics

 

 

 

 

 

Experiential Electives 6 credits: choose 2 courses from the following list:

 

SOC 115: Adirondack Expedition

FOR 120: Insects and Diseases of Trees

PHY 241: Physics I

 

FOR 140: Arboriculture I

GIS 201: Introduction to GIS

PHY 242: Physics II

 

FOR 250: Arboriculture II

FOR 101: Introduction to Forestry

SRV 245: Principles of Surveying

 

FOR 110: Dendrology

REC 101: Introduction to Recreation

REC 250: Recreation Leadership & Maintenance

 

CHM 310: Environmental Chemistry

SRV 100: Surveying I: Fundamentals of Surveying

FOR 206: Forestry Poduction Processes

 

FWS 331: Fisheries Techniques

ENV 361: Limnology

FOR 260: Silviculture

 

FOR 245: Forest Measurements

FOR 220: Lumber Manufacturing & Kiln Drying

SRV 240: Introduction to Field Surveying

 

FOR 330: Forest Soils

FOR 275: Maple Syrup & Sap Production

FOR 235: Timber Harvesting

 

REC 132: Interpreting the Environment

ENV 222: Natural Habitat Interpretation

REC 280: Winter Recreation

 

 

REC 120: Outdoor Recreation Leadership

REC 263: Outdoor Recreation Practicum

Distributive Areas of Knowledge Courses: 12 credits--choose 4 courses, one each from an Area of Knowledge below (preferably at the 300/400 level)

Environmental Science

 

 

 

ENV 450: Advanced Conservation Science

BIO 204: Plant Biology

BIO 355: Plant Physiology

 

ENV 330: Conservation Biology

BIO 363: Mammology

FWS 320: Techniques in Wildlife Management

 

BIO 361: Entomology

BIO 371: Microbial Ecology

FOR 380: Understory and Ground Cover

 

CHM 310: Environmental Chemistry

BIO 364: Ornithology

ENV 473: Wetlands Ecosystems & Management

 

FWS 331: Fisheries Techniques

BIO 472: Paleoecology

BIO 476: Winter Ecology

 

FOR 310: Forest Ecology

 

 

Monitoring and Evaluation

 

 

 

GIS 335: Advanced GIS Techniques

FWS 331: Fisheries Techniques

BIO 371: Microbial Ecology

 

BIO 430: Biometrics

CHM 430: Instrumentation

ENV 473: Wetlands Ecosystems & Management

 

CHM 310: Environmental Chemistry

GIS 201: Introduction to GIS

 

 

ENV 431: Environmental Simulation Modeling

 

 

Liberal Studies

 

 

 

SOC 400: American Labor Movement

SOC 300: Cultural Anthropology

SOC 310: Mobility in Modern Society

 

ENG 340: Contemporary Environmental Writers

GEO 400: Geography of World Cultures

HUM 300: Philosophy of Nature

 

POL 300: Contemporary Political Systems

 

 

Public Participation/Communications

 

 

 

GIS 335: Advanced GIS Techniques

COM 300: Dispute Management

 

 

ENG 340: Contemporary Environmental Writers

ENG 400: Writing on Nature and the Environment

 

Management and Policy Elective Requirements: 12 credits--must be at the 300/400 level: choose 4 courses from below:

 

ENV 450: Advanced Conservation Science

NRS 331: Land Use Planning

FWS 320: Techniques in Wildlife Management

 

COM 300: Dispute Management

FOR 350: Forest Policy

ENV 473: Wetlands Ecosystems & Managment

 

FWS 380: Fisheries Management

NRS 335: Wilderness Management

 

Natural Resources Sustainability

Natural Resources Sustainability is a B.S. degree program that integrates the natural, social and management sciences and that is consistent with the increasing societal and market-driven interest in and demand for conservation and sustainable development, environmental planning and management, green construction, sustainable agriculture and support of local agriculture, sustainable forestry, green business practices, conservation design, recycling and waste reduction, community green space, land use policy and regulation , and alternative energy and energy efficiency.

In addition, the program aims to help students develop tangible tools, including remote sensing and GIS, for assessing and managing sustainable enterprises, while providing an opportunity to develop creativity and curiosity through curriculum flexibility open and restricted electives.

Minimum 121 credits for B.S. degree with 42 credits in 300/400 level courses and 60 credits in the Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Coursework required

 

Core

 

SUS 101: Ecological Foundations of Sustainability

GIS 201: Introduction to GIS

 

SUS 120: Sustainable Community Agriculture

GIS 220: Aerial Photographic Interpretation

 

SUS 200: Conservation Design: Green Communities

GIS 335: Advanced GIS

 

SUS 295: Natural Resources Sustainability Field Experience

FOR 350: Forest Policy

 

SUS 310: Conservation Design: Green Construction

MAT 125: College Algebra

 

SUS 350: Alternative Energy & Energy Efficiency

MGT 200: Principles of Management

 

SUS 490: Integrated Sustainability Seminar

MGT 201: Business Law

 

SUS 495: Natural Resources Sustainability Capstone

NRS 101: Natural Resources & Society

 

COM 300: Dispute Management

NRS 331: Land Use Planning

 

ECN 102: Microeconomics

NRS 410: Natural Resource Economics

 

ENV 315: Environmental Law & Regulatory Processes

 

 

ENV 100: Introduction to Environmental Science

 

 

ENV 455: Sustainable Development

 

 

 

 

General Education and Electives

 

Written Communication Foundation

Responsibility and Expression Reinforcing

 

Written Communication Reinforcing

21 credits of Liberal Arts and Science Electives

 

Quantitative Problem Solving Reinforcing

3 Upper Division Restricted Electives*

 

Social & Cultural Foundation

General Electives to make remainder of necessary credits

 

Responsibility and Expression Foundation

 

 

 

 

*Upper Division Restricted Electives (choose 3)

 

 

HUM 300: Philosophy of Nature

FOR 380: Understory & Ground Cover Flora

 

POL 300: Contemporary Political Systems

FOR 320: Forest Ecology

 

FOR 370: Ornamental Dendrology

SUS 395: Sustainability Externship

 

MGT 310: Human Resource Management

ENG 400: Writing on Nature & Environment

 

EST 310: Environmental History & Social Justice

EST 320: Global Environmental Studies

 

ECN 400: The Global Market

GIS 420: GIS Applications

 

FOR 330: Forest Soils

MGT 400: Strategic Planning & Policy

 

 

 

Recreation, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism, B.P.S.

The Bachelor of Science (B.P.S.) Degree in Recreation, Adventure Travel and Ecotourism (RATE) prepares leaders for professional positions in the field of participatory nature-based tourism. The RATE program seeks to develop students who can plan, conduct and assess ecologically and economically sustainable outdoor pursuits programs within public or private settings committed to global sustainability. Within RATE coursework students will develop critical thinking, management, organization, problem-solving, decision making, communication, collaboration and leadership skills that will be transferable to any professional context. The RATE program addresses wholesome recreation that supports and improves the health of local and global ecosystems, economies and human cultures.

Students in RATE will have exposure to all of the following knowledge areas:

  1. Principles of Sustainability, Recreation, and Nature,
  2. Cultural and Global Relationships,
  3. Management and Administration, and
  4. Outdoor Pursuits Programming and Leadership, in conjunction with a strong liberal arts foundation.

Students will also be required to develop and articulate an Emphasis along with its outcomes as part of their course of study. According to their Emphasis within RATE, graduates can be excellent candidates for outdoor pursuits activity leadership (guiding) positions, recreation resource management positions in public and private parks and reserves, and for positions involving the administration of adventure travel and ecotourism programs and trips. RATE programs of study are highly individualized, building upon the particular interests and career goals of each student, and drawing upon the full array of courses of the Paul Smith's College curriculum. All students are strongly urged both to consult with RATE program advisors and to review planning guides found on the Paul Smith's College website (www.paulsmiths.edu) when planning individual schedules, in order to ensure their timely progress toward degree completion.

The minimum number of credit hours necessary to meet degree requirements for the RATE program is 120. A minimum of 30 credits of the total shall be drawn from the Liberal Arts and Sciences. At least 40 credits shall be 300- or 400-level courses. Students must note that several RATE courses (indicated by *) have prerequisite courses that must be taken before enrollment in the RATE course.

RATE Core Requirements: 40 credits

 

 

MGT 101: Entrepreneurship* OR ECN 400: The Global Market*

REC 320: Adventure Travel and Ecotourism*

 

ENV 455: Sustainable Development

REC 361: Expedition Planning*

 

**Language Sequence

REC 395: RATE Externship*

 

**Language Sequence

REC 480: Issues in RATE*

 

REC 101: Introduction to Recreation

SOC 461 Capstone Project Planning Seminar

 

REC 210: Risk Management and Liability*

SOC 462 Capstone Project*

 

 

 

General Education and General Electives: 59 credits including

 

Written Communication Foundation

Quantitative Problem Solving Integrated

 

Written Communication Reinforcing

Analytic Reasoning Foundation

 

Written Communication Integrated

Analytic Reasoning Reinforcing

 

Responsibility & Expression Foundation

Analytic Reasoning Integrated

 

Quantitative Problem Solving Foundation

Social & Cultural Foundation

 

Quantitative Problem Solving Reinforcing

UD Elective

*Course has prerequisites; check catalog listing.

RATE program elective course offerings are listed on the following page.

**Must be sequential in one language (i.e. Spanish I and Spanish II).

RATE Program Electives: 24 credits

RATE Electives may be selected from a list of approximately 100 courses from all related disciplines available for reference at www.paulsmiths.edu, the Registrar's office or the Forestry Division offices. The selection of Program Electives will be guided by the RATE student's chosen emphasis.

Program Total: a minimum of 120 Credits

RATE Program Electives Table**

Principles of Sustainability, Recreation and Nature:

FOR 110: Dendrology

FOR 340: Forest Management

BIO 364: Ornithology

BIO 210: General Ecology

REC 215: Forest Recreation & Env Problems

POL 202: Politics of the Environment

ENV 420: Environmental Impact Assessment

FOR 330: Forest Soils

REC 270: Recreation Resource Management

ENV 315: Env Law & Regulatory Processes

HOS 101: Hotel, Resort & Tour Orientation

FOR 380: Understory & Ground Cover

FOR 310: Forest Ecology

GIS 201: Introduction to GIS

NRS 340: Watershed Management

FOR 230: Forest Health

FWS 201: Intro to Wildlife Management

ENV 473: Wetlands Ecosystem Management

 

NRS 331: Land Use Planning

NRS 335: Wilderness Management

 

ENV 361: Limnology

BIO 476: Winter Ecology

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outdoor Pursuits, Programming & Leadership:

REC 300: Adirondack Nature-Based Tourism

REC 120: Outdoor Recreation Leadership

REC 263: Outdoor Recreation Practicum

REC 110: Adv Skills and Development I

REC 132: Interpreting the Environment

REC 290: Outdoor Recreation Externship

REC 111: Adv Skills and Development II

RES 170: Food Service Sanitation

REC 250: Recreation Leadership & Maintenance

FOR 270: Draft Horse Management

REC 280: Winter Recreation

REC 240: Recreation Program Planning

REC 362: Eco-Adventure Practicum

ENV 222: Natural Habitat Interpretation

Special Topics in Recreation: Back Country Skiing

 

 

 

 

 

 

Management & Administration:

ACC 101: Financial Accounting

ECN 400: The Global Market

ACC 102: Managerial Accounting

MGT 201: Business Law

HOS 331: Hospitality Futures

MGT 400: Strategic Planning & Policy

SRV 220: CAD I: Fundamentals of CAD

HOS 210: Hotel Accounting

SOC 310: Mobility in Modern Society

REC 275: Design & Admin of Rec Facilities

HOS 265: Hotel Practicum

REC 350: Park Management

COM 300: Dispute Management

HOS 101: Hotel, Resort, & Tourism Orientation

MGT 200: Principles of Management

MGT 101: Introduction to Entrepreneurship

MGT 310: Human Resource Management

NRS 410: Natural Resource Economics

RES 330: Facilities Planning & Environmental Management

MKT 200: Principles of Marketing and Sales

HOS 400: Resort and Recreation Management

MGT 320: The Family Enterprise

ECN 101: Macroeconomics

HOS 300: The Service Economy

FIN 310: Finance

ECN 102: Microeconomics

REC 355: Visitor Management Services

HOS 150: Front Office Property Management

 

 

 

 

 

Cultural & Global Relationships:

HST 215: The Adirondacks

EST 200: Nature and Culture

GEO 200: Physical & Cultural Geography I

SOC 115: Adirondack Expedition

GEO 400: Geography of World Cultures

GEO 201: Physical & Cultural Geography II

ENG 340: Contemporary Environmental Writers

SOC 305: Gerontology

SOC 200: Social Issues

SOC 300: Cultural Anthropology

GEO 105: Geography of World Destinations

Elementary or Intermediate Spanish

Cultural Ecology of Mexico

HUM 210: Issues of Philosophy

ENG 115: Wilderness in American Literature

PSY 200: Ecopsychology

HUM 400: Nature & Art

ENG 350: World Literature

HUM 270: Ethics

SOC 110: Non-Western Cultures

ENG 400: Writing on Nature & the Environment

Elementary or Intermediate French

HUM 300: Philosophy of Nature

 

**Other courses may serve as RATE electives if approved by the Dean of the Division.

Arboriculture and Landscape Management, A.A.S.

The Aboriculture and Landscape Management Program prepares students to perform as professionals and business owners in the areas of tree and landscape planning, planting, and maintenance. The primary emphasis of the program focuses on the field of arboriculture including proper tree care methods. Students also receive classroom instruction and hands-on training in the areas of landscaping, greenhouse operations and turf management.

Graduates are in high demand in this growing profession. Many go to work for and establish and run tree care companies, landscaping firms or tree nurseries. Some students continue their education at four-year institutions in pursuit of a bachelor's degree in Urban Forestry (including the Vegetation Management concentration at PSC).

A minimum of 61 credit hours is required for completion of this A.A.S. Degree program; 20 of the credit hours shall be in the liberal arts and sciences.

First Semester

Fourth Semester

 

Written Communication Foundation

Elective

Responsibility and Expression Foundation

FOR 250: Arboriculture II

FOR 101: Introduction to Forestry

FOR 210: Equipment: Small Engines Repair

FOR 110: Dendrology

FOR 370: Ornamental Dendrology or GIS 201: Intro to GIS

FOR 120: Insects & Diseases of Trees

ACC 101: Financial Accounting

 

 

Second Semester

 

Written Communication Reinforcing

Fifth Semester

Quantitative Problem Solving Foundational

FNR Elective

FOR 140: Arboriculture I

FOR 225: Greenhouse-Turf Practice

FOR 130: Landscape Fundamentals & Interpretation

Business Elective

Social and Cultural Foundation

FOR 285: Urban Forestry Issues

 

Responsibility and Expression Reinforcing

Third (Summer) Session

FOR 295: Aboriculture Externship

 

Forest Technology, A.A.S.

The Forest Technology, A.A.S. Program is designed to prepare students for employment in a variety of forestry related positions, both in government agencies and private forestry companies. During their two years of study, students will be exposed to the major concepts of forestry. In addition, students will obtain practical experience and rigorous training through actual applications of these concepts in the field. Practical course work includes saw milling, timber cruising, timber harvesting, and surveying. Students gain further experience in silviculture, forest management, and forest recreation, as well as such supporting fields as wildlife conservation and aerial photograph interpretation.

The Forest Technology Program is recognized by the Society of American Foresters, a specialized accrediting agency recognized by the Commission on Recognition of Postsecondary Accreditation.

A minimum of 66 credit hours is required for completion of this A.A.S. program; one-third (22) of the credit hours shall be in the liberal arts and sciences.

First Semester

Fourth Semester

Written Communication Foundation

SRV 240: Intro to Field Surveying II

Quantitative Problem Solving Foundation

FOR 241: Forest Mensuration II

FOR 101: Introduction to Forestry

FOR 235: Timber Harvesting

FOR 110: Dendrology

FOR 230: Forest Health

Responsibility and Expression Foundation

 

 

 

Second Semester

Fifth Semester

Written Communication Reinforcing

FOR 201: Forest Management

*Restricted Elective

*Restricted Elective

GIS 220: Aerial Photographic Interpretation

Responsibility and Expression Reinforcing

FOR 260: Silviculture

Social & Cultural Reinforcing

Social & Cultural Foundation

Open Elective

 

 

 

 

Third (Summer) Session

 

FOR 265: Forestry Field Ecology

 

FOR 206: Forest Production Processes or FOR 395: Forestry Externship

 

FOR 255: Measurement and Mapping

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Restricted Electives

 

GIS 335: Advanced GIS

FWS 201: Introduction to Wildlife Management

FOR 140: Arboriculture I

FOR 275: Maple Syrup & Sap Production

BIO 101: Biology I

REC 120: Outdoor Recreation Leadership

BIO 102: Biology II

REC 240: Recreation Program Planning

MGT 201: Business Law

REC 270: Recreation Resource Management

ENV 315: Environmental Law and Regulatory Processes

REC 210: Risk Management and Liability

MGT 320: The Family Enterprise

FOR 210: Equipment: Small Engines Repair

ACC 101: Financial Accounting

FOR 380: Understory and Ground Cover Flora

FOR 310: Forest Ecology

FWS 210: Wildlife Law Enforcement

FOR 350: Forest Policy

FOR 130: Landscape Fundamentals & Interpretation (only 2 credits)

FOR 400: Forest Products

 

ENV 100: Introductory Environmental Science

 

GIS 201: Intro to GIS

 

REC 101: Introduction to Recreation

 

 

 

Surveying Technology, A.A.S.

Students in the Surveying Technology, A.A.S. program learn the concepts and principles needed for a career in land surveying. They gain extensive experience in the application of these concepts and principles to field problems. The surveying externship provides the students with additional experience working with an established land surveying company.

The Surveying Technology Program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accrediting Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc., a specialized accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education.

The New York State Education Department has registered this program for professional purposes. Graduates of the program receive two years of credit toward the admission requirements for the licensing examination for Land Surveyor in New York State.

A minimum of 63 credit hours is required for completion of this A.A.S. Degree program; 21 of the credit hours shall be in the liberal arts and sciences.

Mathematics Entrance Requirement

In order to successfully complete the Surveying program in two years, students must place, via the Accuplacer testing process or via transfer credit, into College Algebra. Students, who do not meet this expectation, while able to enter the College as an undeclared Forestry Associate Degree student, will not be admitted into the Surveying Technology program until they are able to meet the math requirement. Students who do not place into College Algebra will require a third year to complete the surveying program. As such, it is recommended that students take the Accuplacer placement examination as early as possible. Students who are weak in mathematics may choose to take a math course over the summer at a community college to prepare for the College Algebra course in the Fall. A recommended first year schedule for students who place below College Algebra is available and will help the student complete both their Surveying degree and the GIS Certificate program during their three years.

First Semester

Fourth Semester

 

Written Communication Foundation

SRV 260: Route Surveying

* Quantitative Problem Solving Foundation

SRV 250: Topographic Surveying

FOR 110: Dendrology

GIS 260: Geodesy, GPS, & GIS

SRV 100: Surveying I: Fundamentals of Surveying

Mat 210: Statistics

Human Condition Foundation

 

 

Fifth Semester

Second Semester

SRV 270: Law and Land Surveying

 

Human Condition Reinforcing

SRV 290: Problem Solving in Surveying

SRV 101: Surveying II: Automation

SRV 221: CAD II: Surveying Applications

SRV 210: Photogrammetry

Written Communication Reinforcing

SRV 220: CAD I: Fundamentals

Social & Cultural Foundation

MAT 145: Trigonometry

 

 

 

Third (Summer) Session

 

SRV 235: Surveying III: Field Experience

 

WRK 190: Surveying Externship

 

 

 

*Student must start in Algebra in order to take SRV 100: Surveying I: Fundamentals of Surveying

 

Geographic Information Systems Certificate

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related techniques for spatial data collection and analysis are increasingly important tools in forestry, recreation, natural resources, environmental science, and related disciplines. The GIS Certificate Program is designed to allow students currently enrolled in other programs to develop and demonstrate their skills in this important area. It is also possible for a student to enroll solely in this program on either a part-time or full-time basis.

For students enrolled in baccalaureate degree programs, it ordinarily will be possible to complete the requirements for the certificate within the same time frame as the four-year degree. Students enrolled in two-year programs will typically require an additional semester to complete all the requirements for the certificate. For currently enrolled students in all programs, it is critical that they work closely with their advisor to ensure proper and timely selection of courses, including prerequisite courses.

A minimum of 15 credit hours is required to complete this program, but several of the required courses or restricted electives have prerequisites, so students starting with no applicable college-level course credits will typically have to complete a minimum of 22 credit hours.

Program Requirements:

 

 

Required Courses

GIS 420: GIS Applications

 

GIS 201: Introduction to GIS

Restricted Elective

GIS 335: Advanced GIS Techniques

Restricted Elective

GIS 220: Aerial Photography Interpretation or

SRV 210: Photogrammetry or GIS 350: Introduction to Remote Sensing

 

 

 

Restricted Electives (choose 3 courses)

 

FOR 241: Forest Mensuration

SRV 100: Surveying I: Fundamentals of Surveying

FOR 245: Forest Measurements

SRV 101: Surveying II: Surveying Automation

FOR 340: Forest Management

SRV 220: CAD I: Fundamentals of CAD

GIS 260: Geodesy, GPS & GIS

SRV 221: CAD II: Surveying Applications

GIS 350: Introduction to Remote Sensing

SRV 240: Introduction to Field Surveying

GIS 399: Special Topics in GIS

SRV 245: Principles of Surveying

NRS 331: Land Use Planning

SRV 250: Topographic Surveying

NRS 340: Watershed Management

SRV 290: Problem Solving in Surveying

NRS 432: Landscape Ecology

 

Note: Course Prerequisites: Students lacking applicable college-level prerequisite courses will need to complete such courses during the first term of enrollment. Some selections from the “Restricted Electives” category may have pre-or co-requisite courses themselves. Students are advised to check catalog course descriptions and to consult with advisors before registering for any GIS Certificate course(s).