Environment & Society

Environmental Studies, B.A.

The Environmental Studies (B.A.) program uses the tools of the social sciences and humanities to examine the challenging intersection of nature and culture. In the context of the global environmental crisis, Environmental Studies students will learn how different cultures view themselves in relation to the natural world and explore how those views impact Earth's systems. The Environmental Studies program allows students to explore these crucial issues from a variety of perspectives across the traditional disciplines, including politics, the arts, sciences, sociology, economics, ethics, philosophy, and environmental history. The program employs a three-fold thematic approach to build and focus student understanding of the relationship between nature and culture and of the importance of stewardship. The three themes—Environment and Human Expression, Environment and Society, and Environment and Science —represent broad perspectives through which to examine the opportunities and issues surrounding our society's dialogue with nature.

The Environmental Studies program is built upon the College's well-established strengths in environmental and cultural stewardship and in the Liberal Arts. The design of the program is flexible enough to allow students to pursue their individual interests while they are also developing a solid foundational experience in the Liberal Arts. Upon graduation a wide range of career opportunities are open to the Paul Smith's Environmental Studies student. Careers in environmental writing, advocacy, environmental education, parks and recreation, and business are all appropriate for Environmental Studies graduates. In addition, the students may choose concentration electives that prepare them for further academic study.

Degree Requirements:

Minimum 120 credits for B.A. degree with 45 credits in 300/400 level courses and 90 credits in the Liberal Arts and Sciences.

General Education and General Electives

 

Quantitative Problem Solving Foundational

 

 

Written Communication Reinforcing

 

 

FYS 101: First Year Seminar

 

 

Program Requirements

 

 

 

BIO 101: Biology I

ENG 115: Wilderness in American Literature OR ENG 340: Contemporary Environmental Writers

 

Society & Natural World Foundation Course

EST 320: Global Environmental Studies Seminar

 

ENG 101: Effective College Writing

SOC 220: Social Research

 

Environmental & Society Cluster Course

POL 202: Politics of the Environment

 

EST 200: Nature and Culture

NRS 410: Natural Resource Economics

 

BIO 210: General Ecology

HUM 300: Philosophy of Nature OR HUM 400: Nature and Art

 

ECN 200: Principles of Economics

SUS 400: Sustainability Capstone

 

EST 300: Ecological Change and Society

 

 

EST 310: Environmental History and Social Justice

 

 

COM 201: Interpersonal Communication

 

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES THEME ELECTIVES

Environment & Human Expression - Choose 3 courses - 9 Credit Hours (at least one course must be upper division)

 

ENG 210: American Literature I

HUM 135: Photography

 

HST 150: Art History

ENG 211: American Literature II

 

ENG 220: Creative Writing

HUM 270: Ethics

 

HUM 105: Art of Film

HUM 400: Nature and Art

 

HUM 200: Studio Art

ENG 115: Wilderness in American Literature

 

ENG 340: Contemporary Environmental Writers

HUM 300: Philosophy of Nature

 

HUM 210: Issues in Philosophy

ENG 400: Writing on Nature and the Environment

 

COM 340: Reporting and Writing Environmental News

ENG 105: Food Writing

 

ENG 350: World Literature

HUM 115: Western and World Music

 

 

 

Environment and Society - Choose 3 Courses - 9 Credit Hours (at least one course must be upper division)

 

HUM 120: Western Culture

HST 201: History of the United States I

 

COM 305: Change Management

HST 202: History of the United States II

 

HST 215: The Adirondacks

INT 362: Interdisciplinary Field Studies

 

SOC 315: Community Organization and Outreach

COM 216: Mass Communication

 

ENV 420: Environmental Impact Assessment

REC 105: Recreation and Leisure in the US

 

ENV 315: Environmental Law and Regulatory Processes

SUS 120: Sustainable Community Agriculture

 

NRS 320: Environmental Resource Analysis

SOC 110: Non-Western Cultures

 

SOC 300: Cultural Anthropology

REC 350: Park Management

 

FOR 350: Forest Policy

REC 320: Sustainable Nature-Based Tourism

 

SUS 200: Conservation Design: Green Communities

ENV 455: Sustainable Development

 

SUS 310: Conservation Design: Green Construction

SOC 302: The Culture of Food

 

Adirondack Studies

Latin American Studies

Environment and Science - Choose 3 Courses - 9 Credit Hours (at least one course must be upper division)

 

ENV 100: Introductory Environmental Science

FOR 231: Forest Health

 

FOR 110: Dendrology

NRS 432: Landscape Ecology

 

BIO 205: Animal Biology

ENV 361: Limnology

 

BIO 457: Aquatic Invertebrates

FWS 270: Natural History of North American Vertebrates

 

ENV 330: Conservation Biology

BIO 102: Biology II

 

CHM 310: Environmental Chemistry

BIO 472: Paleoecology

 

BIO 220: Evolution

BIO 361: Entomology

 

NRS 300: Ecological Restoration

ENV 471: Stream Ecology and Management

 

FOR 310: Forest Ecology

NRS 340: Watershed Management

 

FWS 105: Introduction to Wildlife

ENV 473: Wetlands Ecosystems and Management

 

FOR 330: Forest Soils

FWS 470: Wildlife Management

 

ENV 120: Geology

BIO 476: Winter Ecology

 

BIO 363: Mammology

FWS 201: Introduction to Wildlife Management

 

BIO 362: Ichthyology

BIO 364: Ornithology

 

BIO 366: Herpetology

BIO 225: Genetics

 

BIO 204: Plant Biology

PHY 241: Physics I

 

BIO 355: Plant Physiology

PHY 242: Physics II

 

ENV 100: Our Environment

FOR 380: Understory & Groundcover Flora

Practitioner Skills - Choose 1 Course - 3 Credit Hours

 

GIS 220: Aerial Photography Interpretation

SRV 100: Surveying I: Fundamentals of Surveying

 

ACC 101: Financial Accounting

EST 220: Introduction to Permaculture

 

ACC 102: Managerial Accounting

REC 240: Outdoor Ed Program Design and Planning

 

COM 220: New Media Tools - Various Topics

MAT 210: Statistics

 

COM 310: Facilitation and Reporting

COM 210: Technical?Communication

 

COM 320: Creating and Communicating Value

FOR 101: Introduction to Forestry

 

GIS 201: Introduction to GIS

FOR 140: Arboriculture I

 

FOR 150: Wood Properties and Production Process

FOR 250: Arboriculture II

 

FOR 270: Draft Horse Management

FOR 275: Maple Sap and Syrup Production

 

FOR 260: Silviculture

FOR 235: Timber Harvesting

 

GIS 335: Advanced GIS Techniques

GIS 350: Introduction to Remote Sensing

 

MAT 335: Financial Decision Making

REC 120: Outdoor Recreation Leadership

 

REC 104: Adventure Recreation Leadership I

REC 204: Adventure Recreation Leadership II

 

REC 133: Environmental Education

SRV 101: Surveying II

Society and Natural World Foundation Course - Choose 1 Course - NRS 110 Environment and Society is a default course for first semester students

 

NRS 110: Introduction to Environment and Society

ENV 110: Foundations of Environmental Science

 

FWS 101: Introduction to Fisheries and Wildlife Management

FOR 101: Introduction to Forestry

 

ENV 100: Our Environment

REC 105: Recreation and Leisure in the US

Integrative Studies, B.S, B.A., A.S. or A.A.

About Integrative Studies

Today's world is in the midst of transformative change—environmental, economic,technological, scientific, and cultural. These changes confront us with new perspectives on what constitutes an educated, empowered person. Institutions of higher education have evolving expectations for student learning and student success. Increasingly, higher education is asked to develop in students not only skills and knowledge required by specific disciplines, but also the interdisciplinary skills student's need to work with diverse groups of people, to develop solutions to unstructured problems, and to demonstrate the self-directed qualities of intentional students (Association of American Colleges and Universities [AAC&U], 2002, 2005, 2007).

Paul Smith’s College endeavors to provide a quality education for its students. Our mission is to educate students to become productive citizens by combining experiential and traditional instruction through our commitment to discovery, discipline, and creativity. PSC programs address student interest in a number of professional programs that provide students with the knowledge and skills to be successful in these areas. The College is also committed to provide depth and breadth in a variety of areas that have been identified as essential to students’ lives.

The Integrated General Education (IGE) Program established five important literacy areas that define the competence and skills necessary to become productive citizens in today’s world: analytical reasoning & scientific inquiry, quantitative problem solving, written communication, social & cultural engagement, and responsibility & expression. The following BA/BS/AS or AA degree in Integrative Studies builds on our Integrated General Education program by allowing students flexibility in developing their own self-designed major. Through this program, students select concentration tracks that appeal to them and form a basis for their future career and personal?goals. The program also builds on the IGE program by placing greater emphasis on the skill areas such as financial literacy and computer literacy which will improve student success rates after college. A BA/BS in Integrative Studies complements the degree programs now available for students to select at Paul Smith’s College. This innovative degree allows students to discover their world and themselves without selecting one of our more career specific majors. This proposed BA/BS in Integrative Studies provides a way for entering students to explore, learn, and identify a focus later in their course work. In addition, this program improves the flexibility of our baccalaureate design by allowing current students in two year programs to add to their Associate's degree with an additional two-years of courses that connect their programmatic focus to their future interests.

Course of Study

Two or Three Topic Model: (BS/BA):

Students will be given the opportunity to integrate two or three topics in either a BA or BS model. The selection will depend on student interest and prerequisite coursework. Working collaboratively with their advisor, students will define a graduation plan in their sophomore year that clearly outlines which track and degree they are pursuing. Please see the program planning guide for more information and a semester by semester course guide example. A minimum of 120 credits, with 42 Upper Division credits and either 60 Liberal Arts and Science credits (BS) or 90 Liberal Arts and Science credits (BA).

Associate Degree (AA/AS):

Students may also choose to pursue an AA or AS degree in Integrated Studies. The AA requires 45 liberal arts and science credits while the AS requires 30 liberal arts and science credits.this proposed new program can also be used to replace current General Studies program expectations for students who are only looking for an Associate’s degree. A minimum of 60 credits is required for graduation.

Integrated General Education Requirements:

 

 

At the Associate and Bachelor Degree Levels:

 

 

Written Communication Foundational Experience

Responsibility and Expression Reinforcing Experience

 

Written Communication Reinforcing Experience

Quantitative Problem Solving Foundation Experience

 

Social Cultural Foundational Experience

Quantitative Problem Solving Reinforcing Experience

 

Social Cultural Reinforcing Experience

Analytic Reasoning Foundation Experience

 

Responsibility and Expression Foundation Experience

Analytic Reasoning Reinforcing Experience

 

INT 200: Integrated Seminar

 

 

At the Bachelor Degree Level only:

 

 

Social Cultural Integrative Experience

Analytic Reasoning Integrative Experience

 

Responsibility and Expression Integrative Experience

MAT 335: Financial Decision Making

 

A required Capstone Experience

 

 

 

Three (3) Topic Degree Requirements for a AA or AS:

 

 

Topic 1: Two (2) courses for a minimum of 6 credit hours

*Electives and Liberal Arts and Science Electives to make the required credit hours listed above

 

Topic 2: Two (2) courses for a minimum of 6 credit hours

*Completion of the Associate Degree general education requirements

 

Topic 3: Two (2) courses for a minimum of 6 credit hours

 

 

 

 

Three (3) Topic Degree Requirements for a BA or BS:

 

 

Topic 1: Three (3) courses for a minimum of 9 credit hours

Topic 1: One (1) Upper Division course satisfying a Gen Ed Integrative requirement for a minimum of 3 credit hours

 

Topic 2: Three (3) courses for a minimum of 9 credit hours

Topic 2: One (1) Upper Division course ?atisfying a Gen Ed Integrative requirement for a minimum of 3 credit hours

 

Topic 3: Three (3) courses for a minimum of 9 credit hours

Topic 3: One (1) Upper Division course satisfying a Gen Ed Integrative requirement for a minimum of 3 credit hours

 

*Completion of the Bachelor Degree general education requirements

*Electives, upper division electives and Liberal Arts and Science Electives to make the required credit hours listed above

 

 

Two (2) Topic Degree Requirements for a AA or AS:

 

 

Topic 1: Two (2) courses for a minimum of 6 credit hours

*Electives and Liberal Arts and Science Electives to make the required credit hours listed above

 

Topic 2: Two (2) courses for a minimum of 6 credit hours

*Completion of the Associate Degree general education requirements

 

 

 

Two (2) Topic Degree Requirements for a BA or BS:

 

 

Topic 1: Three (3) courses for a minimum of 9 credit hours

Topic 1: Three (3) Upper Division courses satisfying a Gen Ed Integrative requirement for a minimum of 9 credit hours

 

Topic 2: Three (3) courses for a minimum of 9 credit hours

Topic 2: Three (3) Upper Division courses satisfying a Gen Ed Integrative requirement for a minimum of 9 credit hours

 

*Completion of the Bachelor Degree general education requirements

*Electives, upper division electives and Liberal Arts and Science Electives to make the required credit hours listed above

Natural Resource Conservation & Management, B.S.

The Natural Resource Conservation and Management program repares students for the challenges ahead with an approach based on a blend of the natural and environmental sciences, technical training in natural resource management-related subject, and a solid foundation of the liberal arts. Included in this blend are numerous opportunities to take highly experiential courses that will have students out in the forests, in the lakes or in the wetlands that surround the campus. Graduates of this program are well prepared for positions with loca?, state and federal agencies involved in natural resource management or environmental consulting firms and non-profit environmental organizations. Minimum 120 total credits, 45 upper division credits and 60 Liberal Arts and Science credits to complete the degree.

 

First Year

 

 

BIO 101: Biology I

Liberal Arts Elective

 

ENG 101: Effective College Writing

COM 201: Interpersonal Communication

 

Responsibility and Expression Foundation

EST 200: Introduction to Nature and Culture

 

Society and Natural World Foundation course

Written Communication Reinforcing

 

Liberal Arts Elective

Quantitative Problem Solving Foundation

Second Year

 

 

BIO 210: General Ecology

ECN 200: Principles of Economics

 

POL 202: Politics of the Environment

SOC 220: Social Research

 

PSY 110: Organizational Psychology

Practitioner Skills Course

 

Practitioner Skills Course

Elective

Elective

 

Third Year

 

FWS 210: Conservation Law Enforcement

ENV 355: Sustainable Development

 

NRS 410: Watershed Management

NRS 410: Natural Resource Economics

 

Cultural Perspective Course - Upper Division

Organisms/Habitats Course

 

Organisms/Habitats Course

Upper Division Elective Course

 

Elective

Elective

Fourth Year

 

 

ENV 420: Environmental Impact Assessment

ENV 315: Environmental Law and Regulatory Process

 

Negotiation/Planning Course

SUS 495: Natural Resource Sustainability Capstone

 

Ecosystem Management Course

Ecosystem Management Course

 

Upper Division Elective

Upper Division Elective

 

Upper Division Elective

Upper Division Elective

Cultural Perspective Course - Choose One Course

 

 

 

EST 300: Ecological Change and Society

SOC 300: Cultural Anthropology

 

 

COM 340: Reporting and Writing Environmental News

GEO 400: Geography of World Cultures

 

 

SOC 400: American Labor Management

SOC 310: Mobility in Modern Society

 

 

ENG 340: Contemporary Environmental Writers

HUM 300: Philosophy of Nature

 

 

POL 300: Contemporary Political Systems

HUM 400: Nature and Art

 

Ecosystem Management - Choose Two Courses

 

 

 

ENV 471: Steam Ecology and Management

FWS 480: Fisheries Biology and Management

 

 

ENV 473: Wetlands Ecosystems and Management

FWS 470: Wilderness Management

 

 

ENV 450: Advanced Conservation Science

NRS 320: Environmental Resource Analysis

 

 

FOR 350: Forest Policy

NRS 300: Ecological Restoration

 

Negotiation/Planning - Choose One Course

 

 

 

COM 300: Change Management

PRK 355: Visitor Management

?/td>

 

 

MGT 306: Business Ethics and Decision Making

SOC 315: Community Organization and Outreach

 

 

MGT 400: Strategic Planning and Policy

SOC 350: Alternative Energy and Energy Efficiency

 

Organisms/Habitats - Choose Two Courses

 

 

 

BIO 204: Plant Biology

BIO 355: Plant Physiology

BIO 476: Winter Ecology

 

FOR 110: Dendrology

BIO 361: Entomology

CHM 310: Environmental Chemistry

 

FOR 231: Forest Health

BIO 362: Ichthyology

ENV 330: Conservation Biology

 

FWS 270: Natural History of North American Vertebrae

BIO 363: Mammology

ENV 361: Limnology

 

PHY 241: Physics I

BIO 364: Ornithology

FOR 310: Forest Ecology

 

PHY 242: Physics II

BIO 366: Herpetology

FOR 380 Understory and Groundcover Flora

 

 

BIO 472: Paleoecology

FOR 330: Soils and Hydrology

Practitioner Skills - Choose Two Courses

 

FOR 101: Introduction to Forestry

FOR 260: Siliculture

SRV 101: Surveying II

 

FOR 140: Arboriculture I

F?R 235: Timber Harvesting

FWS 331: Fisheries Techniques

 

FOR 250: Arboriculture II

FWS 105: Introduction to Wildlife

GIS 335: Advanced GIS Techniques

 

FOR 231: Forest Health

GIS 201: Introduction to GIS

GIS 350: Introduction to Remote Sensing

 

FOR 270: Draft Horse Management

GIS 230: Geospatial Information Technology

SUS 310: Conservation Design: Green Construction

 

FOR 245: Forest Measurements

SRV 100: Surveying I

 

Society and Natural World Foundation Course - Choose One - Environment and Society is a default course for incoming students

 

NRS 110: Environment and Society

REC 105: Recreation and Leisure in the US

ENV 100: Our Environment

 

FWS 101: Introduction to Fisheries and Wildlife Mgt

ENV 110: Foundations of Environmental Science

FOR 101: Introduction to Forestry

Park & Conservation Management, B.S.

The minimum number of credit hours necessary to meet degree requirements for the Parks and Conservation Management program is 122. A minimum of 60 credits of the total shall be drawn from the Liberal Arts and Sciences. At least 40 credits shall be 300/400-level courses.

First Year

 

 

ENG 101: Effective College Writing

Written Communication Reinforcing

 

FYS 101: First Year Seminar

Analytic Reasoning Reinforcing

 

Quantitative Foundation

Quantitative Problem Solving Reinforcing

 

REC 105: Recreation and Leisure in the US

Elective

 

BIO 101: Biology I

Elective

Second Year

 

 

Responsibility and Expression Reinforcing

Elective

 

Social & Cultural Foundation

Elective

 

Liberal Arts and Science Elective

Elective

 

Elective

Elective

 

Elective

Elective

Third Year

 

NRS 320: Environment Resource Analysis

MAT 335: Financial Decision Making

 

PRK 340: Facilities Management

REC 310: Risk Management and Liability

 

PRK 360: Diversity and Inclusion by Design

REC 355: Visitor Management Services

 

Human Dimension Cluster Requirement

Human Dimension Cluster Requirement

 

Liberal Arts and Science Elective

Elective

Fourth Year

 

 

PRK 475: Park and Recreation Design

PRK 490: Integrated Park Management or SUS 495 Natural Resource Sustainability Capstone

 

Human Dimension Cluster Requirement

Human Dimension Cluster Requirement

 

Natural World Cluster Requirement

Natural World Cluster Requirement

 

Natural World Cluster Requirement

Natural World Cluster Requirement

 

Elective

Elective

Human Dimension Cluster: choose 4 courses

 

SOC 320: Shattering Gender Stereotypes

HUM 400: Nature and Art

MGT 306: Business Ethics and Decision Making

COM 305: Change Management

HUM 300: Philosophy of Nature

MGT 330: Operations Management

ENG 400: Writing on Nature and the Environment

SOC 300: Cultural Anthropology

EST 310: Environmental History and Social Justice

ENG 340: Contemporary Environmental Writers

SOC 305: Gerontology

SOC 400: American Labor Movement

ENG 350: World Literature

 

 

 

 

 

Natural World Science Cluster: choose 4 courses--2 courses may be pre-requisites to the courses taken below

 

CHM 330: Biochemistry

ENV 455: Sustainable Development

ENV 420: Environmental Impact Assessment

BIO 310: Biological Effects of Environmental Toxins

FOR 370: Ornamental Dendrology

ENV 330: Conservation Biology

BIO 361: Entomology

CHM 310: Environmental Chemistry

BIO 362: Ichthyology

FOR 330: Soils and Hydrology

FOR 310: Forest Ecology

NRS 432: Landscape Ecology

NRS 410: Natural Resource Economics

BIO 366: Herpetology

BIO 363: Mammology

FOR 3?0: Understory and Ground Cover Flora

NRS 331: Land Use Planning

BIO 371: Microbial Ecology

BIO 364: Ornithology

BIO 472: Paleoecology

BIO 355: Plant Physiology

ENV 473: Wetlands Ecosystems and Management

BIO 476: Winter Ecology

 

Program Total: a minimum of 122 Credits

Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management, B.S.

The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Degree in Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management (RECR) prepares leaders for professional positions in the field of participatory nature-based tourism. The RECR program seeks to develop students who can plan, conduct and assess ecologically and economically-sustainable outdoor pursuits programs within public or private settings committed to global sustainability. Within RECR coursework students will develop critical thinking, management, organization, problem-solving, decision making, communication, collaboration and leadership skills that will be transferable to any professional context. The RECR program addresses wholesome recreation that supports and improves the health of local and global ecosystems, economies and human cultures.

Students in the Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management (RECR) program will have exposure to all of the following knowledge areas:

Students will also be required to develop and articulate an Emphasis along with its outcomes as part of their course of study. According to their Emphasis within RECR, graduates can be excellent candidates for outdoor pursuits activity leadership (guiding) positions, recreation resource management positions in public and private parks and reserves, and for positions involving the administration of adventure travel and ecotourism programs and trips. RECR programs of study are highly individualized, building upon the particular interests and career goals of each student, and drawing upon the full array of courses of the Paul Smith's College curriculum. All students are strongly urged both to consult with RECR program advisors and to review planning guides found on the Paul Smith's College website (www.paulsmiths.edu (http://www., http://www.paulsmiths.edu)) when planning individual schedules, in order to ensure their timely progress toward degree completion.

The minimum number of credit hours necessary to meet degree requirements for the RECR program is 120. A minimum of 30 credits of the total shall be drawn from the Liberal Arts and Sciences. At least 40 credits shall be 300- or 400-lev?l courses. Students must note that several RECR courses (indicated by *) have prerequisite courses that must be taken before enrollment in the RECR course.

General Education and General Electives:

 

 

Written Communication Foundation

 

 

Responsibility & Expression Foundation

Analytic Reasoning Foundation

 

Quantitative Problem Solving Foundation

Analytic Reasoning Integrated

 

Quantitative Problem Solving Reinforcing

Enough electives, LAS and upper division electives to meet credit minimums

 

 

RECR Core Requirements:

 

 

REC 105: Recreation & Leisure in the US

MGT 200: Principles of Mangement

 

REC 104: Adventure Education I

SOC 115: Adirondack Studies

 

REC 120: Outdoor Recreation Leadership

ECN 200: Principles of Economics

 

REC 133: Environmental Education

REC 440: Recreation Theory & Practice Capstone

 

REC 204: Adventure Education II

MAT 335: Financial Decision Making

 

MGT 250: Sustainable Practices in Entrepreneurship

REC 310: Risk Management and Liability*

 

MKT 200: Principles of Marketing

REC 320: Sustainable Nature-based Tourism

 

REC 240: Outdoor Education Program Design & Planning

 

 

 

 

Natural World Cluster (Choose 1 course):

 

 

BIO 101: Biology I

FOR 110: Dendrology

 

SUS 101: Ecological Foundations of Sustainability

ENV 110: Foundations of Environmental Science

 

ENV 120: General Geology

ENV 100: Our Environment

 

 

 

Experiential Cluster (Choose 1 course):

 

INT 362: Interdisciplinary Field Studies

REC 363: Outdoor Leadership Practicum

 

REC 361: Recreation Practicum

 

 

 

 

Diversity Cluster (Choose 1 course):

 

 

SOC 400: American Labor Movement

SOC 300: Cultural Anthropology

 

PRK 360: Diversity & Inclusion by Design

SOC 304: Gerontology

 

SOC 320: Shattering Gender Stereotypes

 

 

 

 

Recreation Management Cluster (Choose 2 courses):

 

 

ACC 301: Small Business Accounting

COM 300: Dispute Management

 

HOS 400: Recreation & Resort Marketing & Management

HOS 320: Festival and Major Event Management

 

MGT 310: Human Resource Management

MGT 330: Operations Management

 

MGT 320: The Family Enterprise

PRK 340: Facilities Management

 

PRK 355: Visitor Management Services

PRK 350: Park Management

 

HOS 325: Destination Dynamics

HOS 331: Hospitality Futures

*Course has prerequisites; check catalog listing.

Program Total: a minimum of 120 Credits

Sustainable Communities & Working Landscapes, B.S.

The Sustainable Communities and Working Landscapes program requires a total of 120 credits with 42 credits in 300/400 level courses and 60 credits in the Liberal Arts and Sciences.

First Year

 

 

BIO 101: Biology I

SUS 120 Sustainable Community Agriculture

 

ENG 101: Effective College Writing

COM 201: Interpersonal Communication

 

Responsibility and Expression Foundation

EST 200: Introduction to Nature and Culture

 

Society and Natural World Foundation course

Written Communication Reinforcing

 

Liberal Arts Elective

Quantitative Problem Solving Foundation

Second Year

 

 

BIO 210: General Ecology

ECN 200: Principles of Economics

 

POL 202: Politics of the Environment

SOC 220: Social Research

 

PSY 110: Organizational Psychology

MGT 250: Sustainable Practices in Entrepreneurship

 

SUS 200: Conservation Design: Green Communities

Sustainable Practitioner Course

 

Elective

Elective

Third Year

 

COM 305: Change Management

ENV 355: Sustainable Development

 

EST 300: Ecological Change and Society

NRS 410: Natural Resource Economics

 

SUS 302: The Culture of Food

Upper Division Elective Course

 

SUS 310: Conservation Design: Green Construction

Elective

 

Elective

Elective

Fourth Year

 

 

MGT 335: Project Management

ENV 315: Environmental Law and Regulatory Process

 

SOC 315: Community Organization and Outreach

SUS 495: Natural Resource Sustainability Capstone

 

SUS 350: Alternative Energy and Energy Efficiency

Upper Division Elective

 

Upper Division Elective

Upper Division Elective

 

Elective

 

Sustainable Practitioner Skills - Choose One

 

ENG 105: Food Writing

FOR 150: Wood Properties and Production Process

 

 

FOR 270: Draft Horse Management

ENG 400: Writing on Nature and the Environment

 

 

FOR 275: Maple Sap and Syrup Production

NRS 300: Ecological Restoration

 

 

FOR 225: Greenhouse-Turf Practice

REC 320: Sustainable Nature-Based Tourism

 

 

HOS 315: Practical Brewing

SUS 295: Sustainable Communities Field Experience

 

 

HUM 200 Studio Art

 

 

Society and Natural World Foundation Course - Choose One - Environment and ?ociety is a default course for incoming students

 

NRS 110: Environment and Society

REC 105: Recreation and Leisure in the US

ENV 100: Our Environment

 

FOR 101: Introduction to Forestry

FWS 105: Introduction to Wildlife Management

EST 101: Introduction to Environmental Science

Forestry

Forestry, B.S.

The Forestry Bachelor's degree builds on the long tradition of forestry education at Paul Smith's College. The strength of the program is the foundation of technical, field-based, and experiential education that is available to students that combines forest science theory and practice. Although it is not required, students in the Forestry Bachelor's program may also acquire one of our two-year technical degrees.

There are three concentrations available within the Forestry Bachelor's degree program. Ecological Forest Management is the most general of these and will prepare students for positions with government forestry agencies, forestry consulting firms, and non-governmental organizations. The Forest Operations concentration is best-suited for students interested in working for forest products companies or running their own forest products firm. Forest Biology, a science-based concentration, is ideal for a student who plans to specialize in a field such as forest ecology or forest entomology and possibly go on to graduate school. Regardless of the concentration, graduates of the Forestry program are also well prepared to continue their studies in graduate school if they choose. Each graduate of this program will have completed a rigorous core curriculum that includes forestry and related courses. The student will also have acquired the solid foundation in liberal arts and sciences, as well as in communications skills, necessary to be an effective professional and a responsible citizen.

The educational program in Forestry leading to the B.S. degree is accredited by the Society of American Foresters (SAF).

A minimum of 121- 123 (depending on concentration) credits with a minimum of 40 credits of 300/400 level courses and 60 credits of Liberal Arts and Sciences credits is required for the B.S. degree.

Ecological Forest Management Concentration, Forestry, B.S.

The minimum number of credit hours necessary to meet degree requirements for the Ecological Forest Management concentration is 122. A minimum of 60 credits of the total shall be drawn from the Liberal Arts and Sciences. At least 40 credits shall be 300- or 400-level courses.

First Year

&n?sp;

 

ENG 101: Effective College Writing

Written Communication Reinforcing

 

FOR 101: Introduction to Forestry

FWS 105: Introduction to Wildlife Management

 

FOR 110: Dendrology

GIS 230: Geospatial Information Technology for Foresters

 

FYS 101: First Year Seminar

Responsibility and Expression Reinforcing

 

MAT 125: College Algebra

Social & Cultural Foundation

Required Summer Session

 

 

FOR 206: Forest Production Processes

FOR 240: Forest Mensuration I

 

SRV 201: Field Surveying I

 

Second Year

 

 

BIO 101: Biology I

ECN 200: Principles of Economics

 

FOR 235: Timber Harvesting

FOR 260: Silviculture

 

FOR 241: Forest Mensuration II

MAT 210: Statistics

 

SRV 240 Field Surveying II

Liberal Arts and Science Elective

 

 

Elective

Third Year

 

BIO 210: General Ecology

FOR 310: Forest Ecology

 

CHM 141: Chemistry I

FOR 340: Forest Management

 

FOR 231: Forest Health

FOR 461: Forestry Capstone Project Planning

 

FOR 350: Forest Policy

NRS 340: Watershed Management

 

Elective

Liberal Arts and Science Upper Division Elective

Fourth Year

 

 

FOR 330: Soils and Hydrology

FOR 462: Forestry Capstone Project

 

FOR 420: Advanced Silviculture

Liberal Arts and Science Upper Division Elective

 

NRS 410: Natural Resource Economics

Upper Division Elective

 

Upper Division Elective

Upper Division Elective

Program Total: a minimum of 122 Credits

Forest Biology Concentration, Forestry, B.S.

The minimum number of credit hours necessary to meet degree requirements for the Forest Biology program is 123. A minimum of 60 credits of the total shall be drawn from the Liberal Arts and Sciences. At least 40 credits shall be 300- or 400-level courses.

?

First Year

 

 

ENG 101: Effective College Writing

Written Communication Reinforcing

 

FOR 101: Introduction to Forestry

FWS 105: Introduction to Wildlife Management

 

BIO 101: Biology I

GIS 230: Geospatial Information Technology for Foresters

 

FYS 101: First Year Seminar

FOR 110: Dendrology

 

MAT 125: College Algebra

BIO 102: Biology II

Required Summer Session

 

 

FOR 206: Forest Production Processes

FOR 240: Forest Mensuration I

 

SRV 201: Field Surveying I

 

Second Year

 

 

BIO 210: General Ecology

Social & Cultural Foundation

 

CHM 141: Chemistry I

BIO 204: Plant Biology

 

FOR 241: Forest Mensuration II

FOR 260: Silviculture

 

ECN 101: Macroeconomics OR

MAT 210: Statistics

 

ECN 102: Microeconomics

CHM 142: Chemistry II

Third Year

 

BIO 225: Genetics

FOR 310: Forest Ecology

 

CHM 241: Organic Chemistry

FOR 340: Forest Management

 

FOR 231: Forest Health

FOR 461: Forestry Capstone Project Planning

 

FOR 350: Forest Policy

NRS 340: Watershed Management

 

Upper Division Elective

Responsibility and Expression Reinforcing

Fourth Year

 

 

FOR 330: Soils and Hydrology

FOR 462: Forestry Capstone Project

 

FOR 420: Advanced Silviculture

Biology Cluster Elective--Upper Division

 

Biology Cluster Elective--Upper Division

Upper Division Elective

 

Upper Division Elective

Upper Division Elective

Biology Cluster Courses: Pick 2 Upper Division courses

 

ENV 330: Conservation Biology

BIO 355: Plant Physiology

ENV 473: Wetlands Ecosystem and Management

BIO 472: Paleoecology

BIO 476: Winter Ecology

FOR 380: Understory and Ground Cover Flora

CHM 330: Biochemistry

NRS 432: Landscape Ecology

BIO 361: Entomology

BIO 362: Ichthyology

BIO 363: Mammalogy

BIO 364: Ornithology

BIO 365: Herpetology

BIO 375: Environmental Microbiology

Special Topics courses in BIO, ENV, CHM, FOR, NRS

Program Total: a minimum of 123 Credits

Forest Operations Concentration, Forestry, B.S.

The minimum number of credit hours necessary to meet degree requirements for the Forest Operations program is 121. A minimum of 60 credits of the total shall be drawn from the Liberal Arts and Sciences. At least 40 credits shall be 300- or 400-level courses.

First Year

 

 

ENG 101: Effective College Writing

Written Communication Reinforcing

 

FOR 101: Introduction to Forestry

FWS 105: Introduction to Wildlife Management

 

FOR 110: Dendrology

GIS 230: Geospatial Information Technology for Foresters

 

FYS 101: First Year Seminar

Responsibility and Expression Reinforcing

 

MAT 125: College Algebra

Social & Cultural Foundation

Required Summer Session

 

 

FOR 206: Forest Production Processes

FOR 240: Forest Mensuration I

 

SRV 201: Field Surveying I

 

Second Year

 

 

BIO 101: Biology I

ECN 101: Macroeconomics OR

 

FOR 235: Timber Harvesting

ECN 102: Microeconomics

 

FOR 241: Forest Mensuration II

FOR 260: Silviculture

 

SRV 240 Field Surveying II

MAT 210: Statistics

 

Liberal Arts and Science Elective

FOR 150: Wood Properties

Third Year

 

ACC 101: Financial Accounting

FOR 310: Forest Ecology

 

CHM 141: Chemistry I

FOR 340: Forest Management

 

FOR 231: Forest Health

FOR 461: Forestry Capstone Project Planning

 

FOR 350: Forest Policy

NRS 340: Watershed Management

 

Liberal Arts and Science Elective

Liberal Arts and Science Upper Division Elective

Fourth Year

 

 

FOR 330: Soils and Hydrology

FOR 462: Forestry Capstone Project

 

FOR 400: Forest Products

Liberal Arts and Science Upper Division Elective

 

FOR 420: Advanced Silviculture

Liberal Arts and Science Upper Division Elective

 

NRS 410: Natural Resource Economics

Upper Division Elective

Program Total: a minimum of 121 Credits

Arboriculture and Landscape Management, A.A.S.

The Aboriculture and Landscape Management Program prepares students to perform as professional? and business owners in the areas of tree and landscape planning, planting, and maintenance. The primary emphasis of the program focuses on the field of arboriculture including proper tree care methods. Students also receive classroom instruction and hands-on training in the areas of landscaping, greenhouse operations and turf management.

Graduates are in high demand in this growing profession. Many go to work for or establish and run tree care companies, landscaping firms or tree nurseries. Some students continue their education at four-year institutions in pursuit of a bachelor's degree in Urban Forestry (including the Parks, Recreation, and Facilities Management program at PSC).

A minimum of 62 credit hours is required for completion of this A.A.S. Degree program; 20 of the credit hours shall be in the liberal arts and sciences.

First Semester

Fourth Semester

 

Written Communication Foundation

 

Responsibility and Expression Foundation

FOR 250: Arboriculture II

FOR 101: Introduction to Forestry

FOR 276: Ornamental Dendrology

FOR 110: Dendrology

ACC 101: Financial Accounting

FOR 120: Insects & Diseases of Trees

GIS 201: Intro to GIS or GIS 230: Geospatial Information Technologies for Forestry

 

Elective

Second Semester

 

Written Communication Reinforcing

Fifth Semester

Quantitative Problem Solving Foundational

NRME Elective

FOR 140: Arb?riculture I

FOR 225: Greenhouse-Turf Practice

FOR 130: Landscape Fundamentals & Interpretation

Business Elective

Social and Cultural Foundation

FOR 285: Urban Forestry Issues

 

Responsibility and Expression Reinforcing

Third (Summer) Session

FOR 295: Aboriculture Externship OR

MGT 101: Introduction to Entrepreneurship OR

MGT 200: Principles of Management

 

Forest Technology, A.A.S.

The Forest Technology, A.A.S. Program is designed to prepare students for employment in a variety of forestry related positions, both in government agencies and private forestry companies. During their two years of study, students will be exposed to the major concepts of forestry. In addition, students will obtain practical experience and rigorous training through actual applications of these concepts in the field. Practical course work includes saw milling, timber cruising, timber harvesting, and surveying. Students gain further experience in silviculture, forest management, and forest recreation, as well as such supporting fields as wildlife conservation and geospatial information technology.

The educational program in Forest Technology is accredited by the Society of American Foresters (SAF).

A minimum of 63 credit hours is required for completion of this A.A.S. program; one-third (20) of the credit hours shall be in the liberal arts and sciences.

First Year

 

ENG 101: Effective College Writing

Written Communication Reinforcing

MAT 125: College Algebra

GIS 230: Geospatial Information Technologies for Forestry

FOR 101: Introduction to Forestry

FORT Cluster Elective*

FOR 110: Dendrology

Responsibility and Expression Reinforcing

FYS 101: First Year Seminar

Social & Cultural Foundation

 

 

Required Summer Session

 

FOR 206: Forestry Production Processes

FOR 240: Forest Mensuration I

SRV 201: Field Surveying I

 

 

 

Second Year

 

SRV 240: Intro to Field Surveying II

FOR 260: Silviculture

FOR 235: Timber Harvesting

FOR 280: Woodlot Management

FOR 231: Forest Health

FORT Cluster Elective*

FOR 241: Forest Mensuration II

Elective

 

 

*FORT Cluste? Electives (choose 2)

 

FOR 150: Wood Properties and Production Processes

FOR 130: Landscape Fundamentals & Interpretation (only 2 credits)

FOR 275: Maple Syrup & Sap Production

FOR 270: Draft Horse Management

FOR 210: Equipment: Small Engines Repair

FOR 140: Aboriculture

ACC 101: Financial Accounting

REC 105: Introduction to Recreation and Leisure in the US

FWS 105: Introduction to Wildlife Management

GIS 201: Intro to GIS

Surveying Technology, A.A.S.

Students in the Surveying Technology, A.A.S. program learn the concepts and principles needed for a career in land surveying. They gain extensive experience in the application of these concepts and principles to field problems. The surveying externship provides the students with additional experience working with an established land surveying company. The Surveying Technology Program at Paul Smith’s College seeks to produce graduates who have the knowledge, technical skills, and professional predispositions necessary for entry level positions in this rapidly changing profession. Graduates will be capable of advancing in the profession to the level of licensed land surveyor. Upon graduation students will be able to select appropriate measurement systems, analyze positional accuracy in conformance with appropriate standards, and prepare land records and plats to meet legal requirements. Specifically students will be able to:

The Surveying Technology Program is accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

The New York State Education Department has registered this program for professional purposes. Graduates of the program receive two years of credit toward the education and experience requirements for the licensing examination for Land Surveyor in New York State.

A minimum of 63 credit hours is required for completion of this A.A.S. Degree program; 20 of the credit hours shall be in the liberal arts and sciences.

Mathematics Entrance Requirement

To successfully complete the Surveying program in two years, students must place, via the Accuplacer testing process or via transfer credit, into College Algebra. Students, who do not meet this expectation, while able to enter the College as an undeclared Forestry Associate Degree student, will not be admitted into the Surveying Technology program until they are able to meet the math requirement. Students who do not place into College Algebra will require a third year to complete the surveying program. As such, it is recommended that students take the Accuplacer placement examination as early as possible. Students who are weak in mathematics may choose to take a math course over the summer at a community college to prepare for the College Algebra course in the Fall. A recommended first year schedule for students who place below College Algebra is available and will help the student complete both their Surveying degree and the GIS Certificate program during their three years.

First Semester

Fourth Semester

Written Communication Foundation

SRV 260: Route Surveying

* Quantitative Problem Solving Foundation

SRV 250: Topographic Surveying

FOR 110: Dendrology

GIS 260: Geodesy, GPS, & GIS

SRV 100: Surveying I: Fundamentals of Surveying

MAT 210: Statistics

Responsibility and Expression Foundation

 

 

Fifth Semester

Second Semester

SRV 270: Law and Land Surveying

Responsibility and Expression Reinforcing

SRV 290: Problem Solving in Surveying

SRV 101: Surveying II: Automation

SRV 221: CAD II: Surveying Applications

SRV 210: Photogrammetry

Written Communication Reinforcing

SRV 220: CAD I: Fundamentals

Social & Cultural Foundation

MAT 145: Trigonometry

 

 

 

Third (Summer) Session

 

SRV 235: Surveying III: Field Experience

 

WRK 190: Surveying Externship

 

 

 

*Student must start in Algebra in order to take SRV 100: Surveying I: Fundamentals of Surveying

 

Natural Science

Biology, B.S.

In addition to providing the required knowledge base, Paul Smith's B.S. program in Biology teaches students how to formulate questions, how to observe and record natural phenomena, how to analyze and evaluate data, and how to draw conclusions from scientific results. In the spirit of our hands-on, experiential approach to learning, Paul Smith's students have full access to a unique “living laboratory” which includes 14,200 acres of college-owned forests, wetlands, lakes, and streams. They are encouraged to study natural habit?ts and environmental issues first-hand, often within walking distance of their residence halls.

Degree Requirements:

Minimum 120 credits for B.S. degree with 40 credits in 300/400 level courses and 60 credits in the Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Coursework required

 

 

Sciences Core

37 Credits

 

BIO 101: Biology I

CHM 241: Organic Chemistry

 

BIO 102: Biology II

PHY 241: Physics I

 

MAT 125: College Algebra*

BIO 210: General Ecology

 

MAT 210: Statistics

SOC 461: Capstone Project Planning Seminar

 

CHM 141: Chemistry I

SOC 462: Capstone Project

 

CHM 142: Chemistry II

 

Biology Core

13 Credits

 

BIO 320: Evolution

BIO 230: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

 

BIO 205: Animal Biology OR BIO 204: Plant Biology

BIO 225: Genetics

Upper Division Electives

18 credits (choose 6 courses)

 

**Please note that students must pass two (2) of the required 200 level PRIOR to enrolling in more than one (1) 300 level BIO course.

 

CHM 330: Biochemistry

BIO 455: Biotechnology

 

BIO 365: Herpetology

BIO 410: Animal Behavior

 

BIO 310: Biological Effects of Environmental Toxins

NRS 432: Landscape Ecology

 

BIO 375: Environmental Microbiology

BIO 361: Entomology

 

BIO 362: Ichthyology

BIO 363: Mammalogy

 

BIO 364: Ornithology

BIO 355: Plant Physiology

 

ENV 330: Conservation Biology

BIO 472: Paleoecology

 

BIO 499: Special Topics in Biology

BIO 476: Winter Ecology

General Education and **General Electives

52 Credits

 

Written Communication Foundation

Quantitative Problem Solving Integrated

 

Written Communication Reinforcing

Responsibility and Expression Foundation

 

Written Communication Integrated

Responsibility and Expression Reinforcing

 

Social and Cultural Foundation

Upper Division Electives to make the remainder of UD credits

 

Social and Cultural Reinforcing

General Electives to make remainder of necessary credits

*MAT 125: College Algebra or higher

**Pre-Professional Students should include PHY 242: Physics II, CHM 242: Organic Chemistry II and MAT 241: Calculus as General Electives in preparation for meeting the entrance requirements of graduate programs or professional schools (e.g. physical therapy school).

Please note that students must pass two (2) of the required 200 level PRIOR to enrolling in more than one (1) 300 level BIO course. Concurrent enrollment in the second 200 level course would be acceptable.

Ecological Restoration, B.S.

The minimum number of credit hours necessary to meet degree requirements for the Ecological Restoration degree program is 120. A minimum of 60 credits of the total shall be drawn from the Liberal Arts and Sciences. At least 45 credits shall be 300- or 400-level courses.

First Year

 

 

ENG 101: Effective College Writing

BIO 102: Biology II

 

FYS 101: First Year Seminar

FOR 110: Dendrology

 

ENV 110: Foundations of Environmental Science

MAT 125: Algebra

 

BIO 101: Biology I

Written Communication Reinforcing

 

 

Social Cultural Foundation

Second Year

 

 

BIO 210: General Ecology

CHM 142: Chemistry II

 

CHM 141: Chemistry I

GIS 201: Introduction to GIS

 

ECN 200: Principles of Economics

HUM 270: Ethics

 

Elective

MAT 210: Statistics

 

 

ENV 120: Geology or GEO 101: General Geography

Third Year

 

BIO 204: Plant Biology

ENV 330: Conservation Biology

 

FOR 330: Soils and Hydrology

FOR 310: Forest Ecology

 

NRS 300: Ecological Restoration

NRS 340: Watershed Management

 

Elective

Elective

 

 

Elective

Fourth Year

 

 

ENV 471: Stream Ecology Management

NRS 495: Integrated Natural Resource Management

 

ENV 473: Wetlands Ecosystems and Management

Human System Cluster Course

 

Human System Cluster Course

Upper Division Elective

 

Upper Division Elective

Upper Division Elective

 

Upper Division Elective

Upper Division Elective

Human System Cluster: Choose 2

ENV 315: Environmental Law and Regulatory Processes

ENV 420: Environmental Impact Assessment

ENV 455: Sustainable Development

HUM 300: Philosophy of Nature

NRS 331: Land Use Planning

NRS 410: Natural Resource Economics

Program Total: a minimum of 120 Credits

Environmental Sciences, B.S.

A broad science foundation and technical expertise characterizes the bachelors in Environmental Science. In addition to building foundational knowledge and skills in Biology and Chemistry, students will gain expertise with Geographic Information Systems technology. This technology is used in a wide variety of situations to store and analyze geographic data related to human use of land and other natural resources. A variety of upper-division electives allows students to tailor their course work to their interests within this broad field of science.

Degree Requirements:

Minimum 120 credits for B.S. degree with 40 credits in 300/400 level courses and 60 credits in the Liberal Arts and Sciences.

General Education and General Electives

 

Written Communication Reinforcing

 

 

Written Communication Integrated

 

 

Responsibility and Expression Reinforcing

 

 

Social & Cultural Foundation

 

 

Program Requirements

 

 

BIO 101: Biology I

POL 202: Politics of the Environment

 

BIO 102: Biology II

GIS 201: Introduction to GIS

 

ENG 101: Effective College Writing

CHM 241: Organic Chemistry

 

ENV 110 Foundations in Environmental Science

CHM 310: Environmental Chemistry

 

FYS 101: First Year Seminar

MAT 210: Statistics

 

MAT 125: Algebra

ENV 330: Conservation Biology

 

BIO 210: General Ecology

SOC 461: Capstone Project Planning Seminar

 

CHM 141: Chemistry I

SOC 462: Capstone Project

 

CHM 142: Chemistry II

 

 

PHY 241: Physics I

 

 

 

 

Science Electives - Choose 6 courses

 

ENV 350: Atmospheric Science

ENV 471: Stream Ecology and Management

 

BIO 310: Biologic Effects of Toxins

ENV 455: Sustainable Development

 

ENV 420: Environmental Impact Assessment

NRS 340: Watershed Management

 

ENV 315: Environmental Law and Regulatory Processes

ENV 473: Wetlands Ecosystems and Management

 

FOR 330: Soils and Hydrology

BIO 375: Environmental Microbiology

 

GIS 350: Introduction to Remote Sensing

Special Topics in Natural Resources

 

NRS 432: Landscape Ecology

Special Topics in Environmental Science

 

ENV 361: Limnology

 

 

GIS 335: Advanced GIS Techniques

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please note that students must pass two (2) of the required 200 level PRIOR to enrolling in more than one (1) 300 level BIO course. Concurrent enrollment in the second 200 level course would be acceptable.

Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, B.S.

The Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences B.S. Program at Paul Smith's College, with concentrations in Fisheries Science and Wildlife Science, offers students the education needed for entry-level positions in state and federal agencies, non-profit organizations and private consulting firms and prepares students for graduate education. Program content is based upon emerging issues in natural resource management and on certification requirements of professional organizations such as the American Fisheries Society and the Wildlife Society. Program activities are coordinated with the Adirondack Watershed Institute, a research and outreach organization based at Paul Smith's College.

This degree includes both a set of program core requirements and core electives (48) credits), and completion of an 18 -to 21 -credit concentration within either Fisheries or Wildlife Sciences. A minimum of 60 credits are liberal arts and science courses; at least 45 credits of the minimum of 120 approved credits required are in the upper-division. The degree is offered within a standard eight-semester sequence, providing opportunity for summer employment, internships or additional studies.

Fisheries Science Concentration Core

General Education and General Electives including:

 

 

 

Written Communication Foundation

BIO 102: Biology II

Written Communication Reinforcing

 

MAT 125: College Algebra (QP-F)

Social & Cultural Foundation

Responsibility & Expression Foundation

 

MAT 180: Precalculus

Social & Cultural Reinforcing

Responsibility & Expression Reinforcing

 

BIO 101: Biology I

 

 

 

 

 

 

Core Requirements

 

 

 

FWS 101: Intro to Fisheries and Wildlife Management

MAT 210: Statistics

GIS 201: Intro to GIS

 

FWS 270: Natural History of North American Vertebrates

BIO 210: General Ecology

 

 

CHM 141: Chemistry I

BIO 225: Genetics

 

 

CHM 142: Chemistry II

 

 

Concentration Core Courses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

BIO 457: Aquatic Invertebrates

ENV 471: Stream Ecology Management

FWS 480: Fisheries Biology and Management

 

BIO 362: Ichthyology

ENV 361: Limnology

FWS 331: Fisheries Techniques

 

NRS 340: Watershed Management

FOR 330: Soil and Hydrology

PHY 241: Physics

 

**SOC 462: Capstone Project

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OR

 

 

Wildlife Sciences Concentration Core

 

 

 

BIO 204: Plant Biology

FWS 320: Techniques in Wildlife Management

 

 

ENV 330: Conservation Biology

FWS 470: Wildlife Management (capstone experience)

 

 

 

 

 

In addition to completing the respective concentration core courses, students will complete a Program Director- and/or Division Dean-approved sequence of elective courses within their selected core, choosing as follows:

Fisheries Sciences Concentrations Electives:

 

 

 

Biologicial Sciences Cluster (Students must choose 2 courses)

Human Dimensions Cluster (Students must choose 2 courses)

 

 

BIO 205: Animal Behavior

ENV 420: Environmental Impact Assessment

 

 

FWS 430: Aquatic Plants

ENV 315: Environmental Law/ Regulatory Processes

 

 

BIO 361: Entomology

HUM 270: Ethics

 

 

BIO 476: Winter Ecology

EST 320: Global Environmental Studies

 

 

FOR 310: Forest Ecology

NRS 331: Land Use Planning

 

 

BIO 220: Evolution

POL 202: Politics of the Environment

 

 

ENV 330: Conservation Biology

NRS 410: Natural Resource Economics

 

 

BIO 350: Anatomy and Physiology I

ENV 455: Sustainable Development

 

 

BIO 351: Anatomy and Physiology II

FWS 210: Wildlife Law Enforcement

 

 

BIO 363: Mammalogy

 

 

 

BIO 364: Ornithology

 

 

 

BIO 371: Microbial Ecology

 

 

 

BIO 472: Paleoecology

 

 

 

BIO 474: Physiological Ecology

 

 

 

ENV 473: Wetlands Ecosystems & Management

 

 

 

NRS 432: Landscape Ecology

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wildlife Sciences Concentration Electives:

 

 

 


Zoology Cluster (Students must choose 2 courses)

Botany Cluster (Students choose one course)

Policy, Administration and Law Cluster (Students choose one course)

 

BIO 205: Animal Behavior

BIO 335: Plant Ecology and Systematics

COM 300: Dispute Management

 

FWS 480: Fisheries Biology and Management

BIO 355: Plant Physiology

ENV 420: Environmental Impact Assessment

 

FWS 430: Aquatic Plants

FWS 430: Aquatic Plants

POL 202: Politics of the Environment

 

BIO 457? Aquatic Inverte

FOR 110: Dendrology

FWS 210: Wildlife Law Enforcement

 

BIO 361: Entomology

FOR 380: Understory and Ground Cover Flora

ENV 315: Environmental Law/ Regulatory Processes

 

BIO 320: Evolution

 

NRS 331: Land Use Planning

 

BIO 230 Comparative Chordate Anatomy

 

NRS 410: Natural Resource Economics

 

FWS 331: Fisheries Techniques

 

ENV 455: Sustainable Development

 

BIO 455: Biotechnology

 

 

 

BIO 362: Ichthyology

 

 

 

BIO 371: Microbial Ecology

 

 

 

BIO 310: Biological Effect of Environmental Toxins

 

 

 

BIO 205 Animal Behavior

 

 

 

Ecology Cluster (Students choose one course)

Physical Science Cluster (Students choose one course)

Wildlife Biology Elective (Students choose two courses)

 

FOR 340: Forest Management

PHY 241: Physics

BIO 363: Mammalogy

 

NRS 340: Watershed Management

ENV 350: Atmospheric Science

BIO 364: Ornithology

 

ENV 473: Wetlands Ecosystems & Management

ENV 120: Geology

BIO 366: Herpetology

 

ENV 471: Stream Ecology Management

FOR 350: Forest Policy

 

 

NRS 432: Landscape Ecology

FOR 330: Soils and Hydrology

 

 

BIO 472: Paleoecology

GIS 350: Introduction to Remote Sensing

 

 

BIO 476: Winter Ecology

 

 

 

FOR 310: Forest Ecology