Academic Program Information

Academic Programs Offered and Hegis Codes

The following section describes the programs of study offered through each academic division of Paul Smith's College, and as appropriate, an academic-term course-scheduling guide to individual programs of study. Students should closely review the recommended sequence of course offerings for each program of study, and should consider course scheduling patterns as listed, if they are changing majors, repeating courses, etc.. While the College makes every reasonable effort to offer courses as closely as possible to the academic-term course-scheduling guides published, it reserves the right to shift from the suggested model as circumstances warrant.

The degrees authorized to be granted by Paul Smith's College are in common use throughout the nation. Enrollment in other than registered or otherwise approved degree programs may jeopardize a student's eligibility for certain student aid awards. All of the degree certificate programs offered at Paul Smith's College qualify students for financial aid eligibility.

Hegis Code

Bachelors Degree Programs

5404.00

Baking Arts and Service Management B.P.S.

0401.00

Biology B.S.

0601.00

Communication, B.S.

0508.00

Culinary Arts and Service Management B.P.S.

0420.00

Ecological Restoration, B.S.

0506.00

Entrepreneurial Business Studies, B.S.

0420.00

Environmental Sciences B.S.

0199.00

Environmental Studies B.A.

0107.00

Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences B.S.

0114.00

Forestry B.S.

0510.10

Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management B.S.

0199.00

Integrative Studies B.A. or B.S.

0115.00

Natural Resources Conservation and Management, B.S.

2103.00

Parks and Conservation Management, B.S.

0510.10

Recreation, Adventure Education and Leisure Management, B.S.

0420.00

Sustainable Communities and Working Landscapes, B.S.

 

 

 

Associate Degree Programs

5403.00

Aboriculture and Landscape Management A. A. S.

5404.00

Baking and Pastry Arts A.A.S.

5404.00

Culinary Arts A. A. S.

5403.00

Forest Technician A.A.S.

5010.00

Hotel and Restaurant Management A. A. S.

0199.00

Integrative Studies A.A. or A.S.

5309.00

Surveying Technology A. A. S.

Integrated General Education Program

Purpose:

The General Education experience at Paul Smith's College allows students to develop the competence and skills necessary to become productive citizens in today’s world. The program focuses on five important literacy areas:

Embedded across all five literacies are the additional competencies of technology literacy and information literacy, which includes critical analysis and reasoning. Each literacy is introduced, reinforced and expanded across the curriculum. Students are encouraged to make connections between liberal arts, discipline, curricular, and co-curricular experiences.

Guidelines:

PSC General Education literacies are delivered, reinforced and enriched across the curriculum in each program offered by the college. This allows each program of study to integrate the general education goals and learning objectives with the program's course requirements.

Foundation (F), Reinforcing (R), Integrated (I) and Multidimensional (MD) learning objectives define what is meant by literacy for each knowledge area.

At the completion of an associate program or at the mid point in a baccalaureate program students should be able to demonstrate reinforcing outcomes.

At the completion of a baccalaureate program students should be able to demonstrate multidimensional outcomes.

 

Associate Degrees:

Students must complete one foundation experience and one reinforcing experience in each of the 5 literacy areas.

Bachelor's Degrees:

Students must complete one foundation experience, one reinforcing experience, one integrated experience and one multidimensional experience in each of the 5 literacy areas.

 

The Integrated General Education Experiences:

 

Foundation Experiences:

The primary purpose of courses designated as a foundation literacy in a knowledge area must be the foundation level outcomes. Students may place above the foundation experience for written communication and quantitative problem solving literacies through college placement testing. The Responsibility & Expression Foundation experience is required in the first semester of the student’s first year at Paul Smith's College. Transfer students who have completed one full time semester at a previous college with a semester GPA of a 2.0 or greater will be considered to have completed the Responsibility & Expression Foundation experience. These students will have to take either a liberal arts and science elective or a general elective to complete the required credits. Foundation experiences may NOT meet the foundation requirement for more than one literacy. An experience may not count as both a foundation and a reinforcing experience.

Reinforcing Experiences:

The reinforcing /intermediate level refers to the student’s ability to apply knowledge in a meaningful way within (but not limited to) their chosen discipline. Objectives at this level build on the literacy foundation by reinforcing and expanding student understanding across the curriculum. Reinforcing level courses are 100 or 200 level courses. Depending on the program outcomes, reinforcing experiences can be found in either program or Liberal Arts and Sciences courses. All students must have one reinforcing experience for each literacy. One course may meet the experience requirement for more than one literacy. While a course may meet both the foundational and reinforcing objectives, that course cannot count for the student as both a foundational and reinforcing experience. Courses designated as reinforcing experiences must meet and assess all of the reinforcing level outcomes for that literacy. Students are encouraged to choose for themselves the kinds of experiences they wish to have in order to meet these expectations.

 

Integrated Experiences:

The integrated/baccalaureate/advanced level refers to the student’s ability to synthesize and construct knowledge from the literacy into their chosen field in order to solve problems or answer questions out of the context in which they learned the concept/skill. Baccalaureate students must have one integrated experience for each literacy. An integrated course should be a discipline oriented program requirement or from a pre-approved cluster of restricted electives. An integrated course is a 300 level course or higher. A student can count one course as meeting more than one integrated literacy experience. Courses at the integrated level must meet and assess all of the integrated level outcomes for that literacy.

 

Multidimensional Experience / Culminating Experience/Capstone - All programs are expected to provide a culminating experience or capstone that meets the standards defined by the Capstone Experience Guidelines approved by Faculty Council May 2008.

 

All IGE level experiences, with the exception of the Multidimensional or Capstone experience,can be met with equivalent transfer credit.

Please consult the course description in SelfService to determine whether a course has been approved as a general elective experience and for which literacy.

Business & Hospitality

Communication, B.S.

The Communication program prepares students to be change agents and leaders in a variety of professions involving business policy and advocacy. The goal of the Communication program is to product leaders who are capable of facilitating internal organizational change, promoting social change, and negotiating problems with diverse audiences. Graduates will apply strategic communication techniques to a chosen field of interest in specific types of organizational settings including for-profit, not-for-profit and government organizations.

The program develops in students a strong foundation in communication theory through coursework including Mass Media, Public Relations, Communication Theory, Rhetoric, Argument and Advocacy, Politics, Change Management, and Intercultural Communication. Additionally, the program develops communication skills appropriate for a variety of settings and applications, including Interpersonal Communication, Group Facilitating, Organizational Communication, Persuasion, Public Speaking, Negotiation, and Technical Communication. Finally, the Communication program is designed to take advantage of the rich array of offerings at the college by requiring students to apply their communication skills and understanding the theory in one or more specific fields, such as the Environment and Natural Resources, Rural Sustainability, Community Development, Tourism, Entrepreneurship, Social Justice, Hospitality and the Food Industry.

The minimum number of credit hours necessary to meet degree requirements for the Communication degree program is 120. A minimum of 60 credits of the total shall be drawn from the Liberal Arts and Sciences. At least 45 credits shall be 300- or 400-level courses.

First Year

 

 

ENG 101: Effective College Writing

COM 201: Interpersonal Communication

 

FYS 101: First Year Seminar

COM 210: Technical Communication

 

COM 102: Introduction to Communication and Leadership

Analytical Reasoning - Reinforcing

 

PSY 110: Organizational Behavior

Quantitative Problem Solving - Foundational

 

Analytical Reasoning - Foundation

Elective

Second Year

 

 

COM 216: Mass Communication

MKT 200: Principles of Marketing

 

Communication Methods Cluster Course

SOC 220: Social Research

 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Elective

Communication Methods Cluster Course

 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Elective

Liberal Arts and Sciences Elective

 

Elective

Elective

Third Year

 

COM 310: Facilitation and Reporting

COM 305: Change Management

 

MKT 304: Advertising and Promotions

SOC 315: Community Organization and Outreach

 

Communication Methods Cluster Course

Diversity Cluster Course

 

Diversity Cluster Course

Liberal Arts and Sciences Elective

 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Elective

Upper Division Elective

Fourth Year

 

 

COM 320: Creating and Communication Value

COM 495: Communication Exploration Capstone

 

MGT 335: Project Management

Upper Division Elective

 

Diversity Cluster Course

Upper Division Elective

 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Elective

Upper Division Elective

 

Upper Division Elective

Upper Division Elective

Communication Methods Cluster - Choose 3 (9 credits total):

COM 101: Speech

COM 220: New Media Tools: Various Topics

HUM 135: Photography

HUM 150: Survey of Art: Various Topics

Diversity Cluster - Choose 3 (9 credits total):

PRK 360: Diversity and Inclusion by Design

SOC 300: Cultural Anthropology

SOC 305: Gerontology

SOC 310: Mobility in Modern Society

SOC 320: Shattering Gender Stereotypes

SOC 400: American Labor Movement

Program Total: a minimum of 120 Credits

Entrepreneurial Business Studies, B.S.

Entrepreneurship is a core American value which forms the basis of our economics and social system. The Entrepreneurial Business Studies program explores the balance between the rewards and challenges of individual business innovation set within a social-economic system of shared services, social systems, and values. Students in Entrepreneurial Business Studies (EBSB) program study the process of entrepreneurism, management, finance, accounting, communications, marketing, economics, program, and information management. The program focuses on providing students with the opportunity to study all dimensions of management, set in a context of sustainability, small business, and community.

Graduates of the program should be able to:

To complete the B.S. degree program, a minimum of 120 credits must be completed, 60 credits must be in the Liberal Arts and Sciences, and at least 45 credits must be in the upper-division (300- and 400- level courses).

EBSB Course of Study

Each year of study builds on the Core EBSB and General Education curricula from the previous years of study, The recommended sequence of courses is delineated below.

Phase I Courses: First Year of Study

 

 

Written Communication Foundation

MKT 200: Principles of Marketing

 

FYS 101: First Year Seminar

Written Communication-Reinforcing

 

Quantitative Problem Solving Foundation

PSY 101 Psychology or PSY 110: Organizational Behavior

 

MGT 101: Introduction to Entrepreneurship

Analytical Reasoning Foundation-LAS

 

MGT 200: Principles of Management

Liberal Arts/Science Elective*

 

 

 

Phase II Courses: Second Year of Study

 

 

MGT 210 Entrepreneurship Systems, Resources & Policies

SOC 220: Social Research

 

ACC 101: Financial Accounting

ACC 102: Managerial Accounting II

 

ECN 200: Principles of Economics

MGT 250: Sustainable Practices in Entrepreneurship

 

Liberal Arts/Science Elective*

Elective

 

Liberal Arts/Science Elective*

Elective

 

 

 

Phase III Courses: Third Year of Study

 

 

MGT 306: Business Ethics & Decision Making

FIN 310: Finance

 

MAT 210: Statistics

MGT 360: Applications in Entrepreneurship

 

MAT 335: Financial Decision Making

MGT 335: Project Management

 

Liberal Arts/Science Elective*

Elective - Upper Division*

 

Liberal Arts/Science Elective*

Liberal Arts/Science Elective*

 

 

 

Phase IV Courses: Fourth Year of Study

 

 

COM 305: Change Management

MGT 490: Entrepreneurship Capstone

 

COM 320: Creating & Communicating Values

Elective-Upper Division*

 

Elective*

Elective-Upper Division*

 

Elective-Upper Division*

Elective-Upper Division*

 

Liberal Arts/Science Elective-Upper Division*

Elective-Upper Division*

 

 

 

*May be used for General Education requirements

“4 + 1” Articulation Agreement

Students can also consider pursuing a Master's degree in Business Administration, or an M.S. in Human Resource Management, Information Systems or Manufacturing from Clarkson University through a “4 + 1” articulation agreement between Paul Smith's College and Clarkson University, thereby earning both a Bachelor's degree and a Master's degree in only five years.

Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management, B.S.

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management prepares graduates for exciting careers in the fastest growing fields of hospitality. This dynamic industry is now one of the largest in the world. The opportunities in the Hospitality industry are many and varied. These range from being the General Manager of a hotel, resort, casino, club, or food service operation, or the Director of Marketing for a hospitality organization, or a real estate developer or owner of hotels and resorts. One could find oneself employed in small privately owned hospitality business all the way up to working for a global multi-unit hotel or resort corporation in an international location.

Students will be taught a set of marketable, transferable skills that are applicable to a wide range of industries both in and outside of the "umbrella of Hospitality". This is because Hospitality Management is not just a set of hard skills one uses within specific organizations but is, rather, a "way" to run a business. One that is customer focused, in tune with the needs of the market and set up to develop long term relationships with the guest and employee.

Specifically, students will study applied business areas of marketing, finance, internal and external communications, customer relationship management, trend studies, guest psychology, teamwork and leadership.

Code of Professionalism and Uniform Requirements

Professionalism is stressed throughout this program and is applied student appearance during applied work experiences, guest lectures and site visits. It is required that all students have a specified business suit to use for these occasions. This suit is worn as a requirement of HOS Field Studies in Hospitality 350 and HOS 250 Applications in Hospitality. The suit can be acquired through Land’s End Business Outfitters.

Other lab courses electives may have specific uniform requirements in addition to the one stated above. In these cases, the uniform will be stated in the Course Syllabus. Co-curricular opportunities may arise that will require the student to wear a pair of black dress pants, a long-sleeved oxford button down collar white shirt a black tie, black socks and black dress shoes.

The minimum number of credit hours required to complete this program is 120; 60 of the credit hours shall be in the liberal arts and sciences and 45 credit hours must be of upper division 300/400 level courses. 800 hours of internship/industry work experience are required for this degree with no less than 200 hours occurring at each internship site.

General Education and General Electives:

 

ENG 101: Effective College Writing

Social & Cultural Foundation

Written Communication Reinforcing

 

Quantitative Problem Solving Foundation

Enough electives to satisfy total, LAS and upper division requirements

Responsibility & Expression Foundation

 

Analytical Reasoning Foundation

 

Analytical Reasoning Reinforcing

 

 

 

Core Requirements:

 

ACC 101: Financial Accounting

 

HOS 101: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Orientation

HOS 462: Hospitality Business Simulation

HOS 210: Hotel Accounting

Elementary Language I**

HOS 331: Hospitality Futures

Elementary Language II**

HOS 350: Field Studies in Hospitality

3 Customer Relations Cluster Courses

MAT 335 :Financial Decision Making

4 Management Cluster Courses

RES 431: Cultural Enology

1 Diversity Relations Cluster Course

MGT 400: Strategic Planning and Policy

 

 

 

Customer Relations Cluster (Choose 3 courses)

Management Cluster Courses (choose 4 courses)

HOS 150: Front Office Property Management

HOS 320: Festival and Major Event Management

RES 132: Dining Room and Kitchen Operations

MGT 330: Operations Management

MGT 200: Principles of Management

MIS 410: Management Information Systems

MKT 200: Principles of Marketing

HOS 400: Recreation&Resort Marketing & Management

RES 130: Introduction to Beverage and Table Service

ECN 400: Global Markets

 

MGT 320: The Family Enterprise

Diversity Relations Cluster (Choose 1 course)

MGT 306: Business Ethics and Decision Making

SOC 320: Shattering Gender Stereotypes

MGT 310: Human Resource Management

SOC 305: Gerontology

COM 300: Dispute Management

HOS 310: History of the World in 6 Glasses

REC 330: Facilities Planning&Environmental Management

SOC 400: American Labor Movement

 

 

 

800 hours of internship/industry work experience are required for this degree with no less than 200 hours occurring at each internship site.

** Students are required to demonstrate a language competency at the Conversational Language II or Elementary Language II level to complete their graduation requirements.

* Please be advised that the Internship/Industry Work Experience is no-credit and there are no charges for the course, therefore, students who choose to complete this course alone during a semester will not be considered as an enrolled student during that particular semester.

Hotel and Restaurant Management, A.A.S.

The Hotel and Restaurant Management, A.A.S. curriculum is designed to serve both those students who plan to begin work in the industry upon completion of the two-year program and students who wish to pursue a baccalaureate degree.

Students will be taught a set of marketable, transferable skills that are applicable to a wide range of industries both in and outside of the "umbrella of Hospitality". This is because Hospitality Management is not just a set of hard skills one uses within specific organizations but is, rather, a "way" to run a business. One that is customer focused, in tune with the needs of the market and set up to develop long term relationships with the guest and employee.

This program is designed to provide a student with the skills and background required for an excellent start in the hospitality industry and to help in rapid professional development. The program also allows students to continue and complete the baccalaureate degree offered at Paul Smith's College in Hotel, Resort and Tourism Management.

Code of Professionalism and Uniform Requirements

Professionalism is stressed throughout this program and is applied student appearance during applied work experiences, guest lectures and site visits. It is required that all students have a specified business suit to use for these occasions. This suit is worn as a requirement of HOS Field Studies in Hospitality 350 and HOS 250 Applications in Hospitality. The suit can be acquired through Land’s End Business Outfitters.

Other lab courses electives may have specific uniform requirements in addition to the one stated above. In these cases, the uniform will be stated in the Course Syllabus. Co-curricular opportunities may arise that will require the student to wear a pair of black dress pants, a long-sleeved oxford button down collar white shirt a black tie, black socks and black dress shoes.

A minimum of 61 credit hours is required for completion of this A.A.S. degree program; 20 credit hours shall be in the Liberal Arts and Sciences. An internship/work experience (WRK 290) 400 hours are required for this degree with no less than 200 hours occurring at each internship site.

First Semester

Third or Fourth Semester

 

ENG 101: Effective College Writing

*Business Elective

 

Responsibility and Expression Foundation

*Business Elective

 

Quantitative Problem Solving Foundation

CUL 280: Nutrition

 

ACC 101: Financial Accounting I

**Liberal Arts Elective

 

HOS 101: Hotel, Resort and Tourism Industry Orientation

**Elective

 

 

RES 132: Dining Room and Kitchen Operations

Second Semester

 

 

Written Communication Reinforcing

Third or Fourth Semester

 

Social & Cultural Foundation

HOS 270: Hospitality Applications

 

HOS 150: Front Office/Property Management

HOS 210: Hotel Accounting

 

RES 250: Intro to Food Production

Elective

 

RES 170: Food Service Sanitation

 

WRK 290: Internship/work Experience (400 hours) are required for this degree with no less than 200 hours occurring at each internship site.

* Please be advised that the Internship/Industry Work Experience is no-credit and there are no charges for the course, therefore, students who choose to complete this course alone during a semester will not be considered as an enrolled student during that particular semester.

*Business electives: ACC 102: Managerial Accounting, MGT 201: Business Law, MKT 200: Principles of Marketing and Sales, MGT 200: Principles of Management, MGT 310: Human Resource Management, or other elective with Dean approval.

**A language is recommended.